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Hypoxia: A Serious Threat to Aviation Safety

Hypoxia is the condition that occurs when the body does not obtain substantial oxygen. Lack of oxygen is one of the most dangerous conditions at high altitudes, especially when coupled with inadequate pressure and/or temperatures. When a pilot inhales air at high altitudes, there is not enough pressure to force sufficient amounts of oxygen to the lungs, causing the function of various organs, including the brain, to be impaired.

Hypoxia is difficult to detect and, unfortunately, the nature of hypoxia makes the pilot the poorest judge of when it occurs. The first symptoms of oxygen deficiency resemble mild intoxication from alcohol. Most humans are completely unaware of this state of affairs and ‘believe’ they are fully conscious, when in actual fact they are in a comatose state.

The following suggestions can prevent hypoxia from getting a foot in your door:

  1. Carry oxygen and use it before you start to become hypoxic. Measure your oxygen needs by the altimeter. Use oxygen on every flight above 12,500 feet.
  2. If you do not count on a supplemental oxygen source, do not fly above 12,500 feet. If bad weather is in your course, avoid it by going around instead of climbing to higher altitudes.
  3. Pilots who are older, overweight, or smoke heavily should limit themselves to a ceiling of 10,000 feet flying levels unless supplemental oxygen is available.
  4. Use oxygen on long flights at or above 10,000 feet.
  5. Use oxygen on night flights at or above 5,000 feet.
  6. When using oxygen breathe normally. Extremely deep oxygen breathing can also cause loss of consciousness.

Besides the aforementioned recommendations, if you want to be a modern precautionary pilot you can carry a simple electronic instrument called pulse oximeter which clips on your fingertip, measures the oxygen saturation of the blood and instantly displays it on a tiny digital screen. It works as a “hypoxia tester” and could become your inseparable ally.

 

Understanding Air Density and its Effects

Understanding air density and its effects

By Jack Williams, USATODAY.com

In simple terms, density is the mass of anything – including air – divided by the volume it occupies.

In the metric system, which scientists use, we usually measure density in terms of kilograms per cubic meter.

The air’s density depends on its temperature, its pressure and how much water vapor is in the air. We’ll talk about dry air first, which means we’ll be concerned only with temperature and pressure.

In addition to a basic discussion of air density, we will also describe the effects of lower air density – such as caused by going to high altitudes – on humans, how humidity affects air density – you might be surprised – and the affects of air density of aircraft, baseballs, and even racing cars.

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Fire Hazard in Resetting Circuit Breakers

INFORMATION BULLETIN

A Special Airworthiness Information Bulletin (SAIB) advising pilots, owners, operators, and maintenance personnel of potential hazards of resetting an opened circuit breaker on General Aviation aircraft was published on December 23, 2009, and then a revision was issued on January 14, 2010 that can be found Continue reading

Benefits of Training in Coast Flight Academy’s Airspace

To many pilots, flying in metropolitan airspace is confusing and scary.  Trying to stay clear of class B airspace, avoiding other aircraft in the area and flying your aircraft, all at the same time, can be grueling and tedious!  Seasoned pilots know, initially, the San Diego area airspace looks challenging and complex; however, students training at Coast Flight Academy, located at Montgomery Field (KMYF), are better prepared and more confident, than the average pilot, with a variety of airports and airspace areas. Continue reading

Overcoming FAA Checkride Anxiety

The anticipation of the FAA Checkride is considered one the most nerve racking and stressful situations a pilot must go through in the course of their training.  Once the training is completed and the students has passed all written tests and stage check exams, the daunting Checkride is then scheduled.  Even though the Checkride is stressful and taxing, one should have total confidence in their abilities, as both the student’s flight instructor and the flight school have signed off the student; therefore, indicating they feel secure in their decision.  However, most students still feel the pressure. Continue reading

High-Altitude Chamber Course: Why it is a Must for Any Pilot

Statistics indicate that human factor errors are involved in 85% of aircraft accidents.  A number of these accidents have been the result of hypoxia.  Coast Flight Training is one, of only a few, flight schools that offers a High-Altitude Chamber Training Course for its students.

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