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VA Approval

Department of Veterans Affairs

The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has approved Coast Flight Training and Management as one of the few entities allowed to receive free funding for military veterans who want and qualify to become pilots.

Flight training at Coast can now be funded for military veterans in a similar way to VA benefits to attend college. In recent years, Congress has approved flight training as a vocational program that qualifies for VA support.

VA will cover 60% of a qualified individual’s flight and instructor costs during the instrument and commercial phases of training and 100% of the written exam and check ride fees. Additionally, Coast Flight Training received a special waiver, which allows for more costs to be covered than is standard. This special waiver was approved given Coasts state of the art fleet infrastructure and academic standards. Students have the option of training in advanced aircraft such as the Cirrus SR20 and SR22 models.

Transfer to Coast Flight Training from another program or school is very easy. Course work and training already complete shall be recognized as part of our program requirements.

If a student is called back to active duty or encounters personal reasons for suspension of training VA benefits will not be taken away. Training can resume anytime without any loss of the student’s VA benefits.

If you are a VA beneficiary or know someone who is, and are interested in learning more about this program, please visit our website or contact our student concierge.

www.iflycoast.com
858-279-4359

Coast Flight Training – Free 10 minute test Program

Learn the value of a Full Motion Flight Simulator with Coast Flight Training’s new Full Motion Flight Simulator. Experience the program for free in 10 minutes.

Flight Simulator

Flight Simulator Programs include:

1) 1 Day Currency Training

2) Emergency Procedures

3) Instrument Training

4) Instrument training in support of  private/instrument pilot ratings to reduce cost of certification

5) Partner in command course

These Simulator Programs were designed by Jeff Bushnell, a Retired  Air Force Colonel who’s 25 years in Air Force training and a background on C141 instruction and Flight Examination.

jeff

Schedule a flight, email us at info@iflycoast.com or call us 858-279-4359.

Coast High Altitude Chamber Programs

Topics covered during the Standard Course consist of Physics of the Atmosphere, Respiration/Circulation, Hypoxia/Hyperventilation, Trapped Gas Problems, Evolved Gas Disorders, Vision, and Human Factors. All academics are taught in the morning followed by a lunch break.  The altitude chamber flight profile for the Standard course consists of a FAA Type I profile to 25,000’. After each person experiences his or her individual hypoxia symptoms at this altitude, descent is made to 18,000’ where they undergo a Loss of Night Vision Acuity demonstration.  This is followed by descent to ground level, a question and answer period, and the presentation of certificates.
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Hypoxia: A Serious Threat to Aviation Safety

Hypoxia is the condition that occurs when the body does not obtain substantial oxygen. Lack of oxygen is one of the most dangerous conditions at high altitudes, especially when coupled with inadequate pressure and/or temperatures. When a pilot inhales air at high altitudes, there is not enough pressure to force sufficient amounts of oxygen to the lungs, causing the function of various organs, including the brain, to be impaired.

Hypoxia is difficult to detect and, unfortunately, the nature of hypoxia makes the pilot the poorest judge of when it occurs. The first symptoms of oxygen deficiency resemble mild intoxication from alcohol. Most humans are completely unaware of this state of affairs and ‘believe’ they are fully conscious, when in actual fact they are in a comatose state.

The following suggestions can prevent hypoxia from getting a foot in your door:

  1. Carry oxygen and use it before you start to become hypoxic. Measure your oxygen needs by the altimeter. Use oxygen on every flight above 12,500 feet.
  2. If you do not count on a supplemental oxygen source, do not fly above 12,500 feet. If bad weather is in your course, avoid it by going around instead of climbing to higher altitudes.
  3. Pilots who are older, overweight, or smoke heavily should limit themselves to a ceiling of 10,000 feet flying levels unless supplemental oxygen is available.
  4. Use oxygen on long flights at or above 10,000 feet.
  5. Use oxygen on night flights at or above 5,000 feet.
  6. When using oxygen breathe normally. Extremely deep oxygen breathing can also cause loss of consciousness.

Besides the aforementioned recommendations, if you want to be a modern precautionary pilot you can carry a simple electronic instrument called pulse oximeter which clips on your fingertip, measures the oxygen saturation of the blood and instantly displays it on a tiny digital screen. It works as a “hypoxia tester” and could become your inseparable ally.

 

Fire Hazard in Resetting Circuit Breakers

INFORMATION BULLETIN

A Special Airworthiness Information Bulletin (SAIB) advising pilots, owners, operators, and maintenance personnel of potential hazards of resetting an opened circuit breaker on General Aviation aircraft was published on December 23, 2009, and then a revision was issued on January 14, 2010 that can be found Continue reading

Steps to Becoming a Commerical Airline Pilot

Becoming a pilot for a major airline, such as United and Northwest, takes years of hard work, dedication and perseverance.  Many aspiring pilots are under the impression, that upon completion of the Commercial license, they will be qualified to work for an airline immediately.  Unfortunately, this is not the case.  The good news is there are many different options and routes pilots may take in order to achieve their final goal. Continue reading

Benefits of Training in Coast Flight Academy’s Airspace

To many pilots, flying in metropolitan airspace is confusing and scary.  Trying to stay clear of class B airspace, avoiding other aircraft in the area and flying your aircraft, all at the same time, can be grueling and tedious!  Seasoned pilots know, initially, the San Diego area airspace looks challenging and complex; however, students training at Coast Flight Academy, located at Montgomery Field (KMYF), are better prepared and more confident, than the average pilot, with a variety of airports and airspace areas. Continue reading

Cirrus Skill Refresher Course

As a Cirrus pilot, you are on the forefront of aviation and should maintain proficiency in the aircraft in order to ensure overall safety.  This is why Cirrus has developed the Cirrus Pilot Learning Plan, for operators and owners, to ensure you stay current and proficient following your initial transition training. Continue reading

Overcoming FAA Checkride Anxiety

The anticipation of the FAA Checkride is considered one the most nerve racking and stressful situations a pilot must go through in the course of their training.  Once the training is completed and the students has passed all written tests and stage check exams, the daunting Checkride is then scheduled.  Even though the Checkride is stressful and taxing, one should have total confidence in their abilities, as both the student’s flight instructor and the flight school have signed off the student; therefore, indicating they feel secure in their decision.  However, most students still feel the pressure. Continue reading