Coast Flight Training, San Diego, CA Flight School | San Marcos, TX Flight School | Airline Pilot Training
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San Marcos, TX

Address:
1837 Airport Dr. San Marcos, TX 78666
Phone: (858)279-4359
Email: info@iflycoast.com

San Diego, CA

Address:
8525 Gibbs Dr. Suite 105 San Diego, CA 92123
Phone: (858)279-4359
Email: info@iflycoast.com

 
 

Blog

Blog • August 15, 2012
An in-flight emergency can occur at any moment. And depending on how long you’ve been flying, the skills and procedures you once learned about how to react in an emergency situation, may not remain clear in your memory years later. Even if you feel fairly familiar with emergency procedures, there is never such a thing as being too prepared for an emergency. For this reason, Coast Flight Training is offering an emergency procedure refresher course. After just one day, you will be far better off in any emergency flight situation than you were before. The day is broken up into two hours of ground school and four hours of simulation, where you will be given the chance to react to an emergency...
Blog • July 2, 2012
For most of us, we learned to use the word "Roger" early in our aviation career. We learned that it simply means that we heard and understand what the other person said. We were clearly taught that it connotes no permission or authorizations. For whatever reason, we then go through our career or hobby of flying and hardly ever use that word. And we seldom hear it spoken by ATC! So what happens when we have a problem on the airfield and we tell ATC that we need to do something and they say "Roger?" What does that mean? Let me give you a recent example...
Blog • June 16, 2012
And with that short exchange, Trevor was granted permission to fly the Cirrus SR-20. He leaned forward, closed his preflight checklist, and pulled onto the strip. As he began to pick up speed to prepare for takeoff, his face tensed slightly in anticipation. “When you’re taking off, it’s like, ‘Well, there’s no turning back now,’” Trevor said. “For the most part, once you’re going [on the runway], you have to get airborne. You can’t just stop and turn around.” Turning back isn’t something that Trevor would do though, not after all of his hard work. For him, earning his private pilot’s license last July was just one step in his ultimate dream of becoming a fighter pilot...
Airline Pilot Industry • June 13, 2012
The best way to conserve jet fuel is to turn off the gas engines. That’s only possible with an alternative power source, like the battery packs and electric motors in the Boeing SUGAR Volt’s hybrid propulsion system. The 737-size, 3,500-nautical-mile-range plane would draw energy from both jet fuel and batteries during takeoff, but once at cruising altitude, pilots could switch to all-electric mode. At the same time Boeing engineers...
Airline Pilot Industry • June 5, 2012
The first era of commercial supersonic transportation ended on November 26, 2003, with the final flight of the Concorde, a noisy, inefficient and highly polluting aircraft. But the dream of a sub-three-hour cross-country flight lingered, and in 2010, designers at Lockheed Martin presented the Mach 1.6 Supersonic Green Machine. The plane’s variable-cycle engines would improve efficiency by switching to conventional turbofan mode during takeoff and landing...