Author Archives: Coast Flight Training

Cirrus SR-22: Fly to Your Future

The Cirrus SR22, which was launched in 2000, is a more powerful version of the Cirrus SR20 and with a larger wing, a higher fuel aptitude and a larger engine used by private pilots all over the world. This single-engine, four seat aircraft is purchased by many aircraft enthusiasts because of the great architecture that exemplifies its usage for a more comfortable flight flying experience.  The SR22 continues to be the world’s best selling general aviation aircraft for many years now.

SR22 Design and Engine

In addition to the pilot, The SR22 can carry up to 4 passengers.  The SR-22 has a fixed landing gear that stands out from other aircrafts. It has a tricycle-designed landing gear and introduces pivoting nose steering using differential brakes on the main wheels. Like all Cirrus aircraft, it has the Cirrus Aircraft Parachute System (CAPS); an emergency parachute pack that can lower the whole aircraft in case of an emergency landing.
It also has the Tornado Alley, an upgrade of the turbo-normalizing kit that has twin turbo-normalizers and intercoolers, as well. With this kind of turbo-normalizer, a pilot may choose to fly higher and faster because of its capacity to store oxygen (which actually can be a built in feature of the SR-22). It is also designed with the light-weight Hartzell 3-blade propeller. It is known to be the fastest aircraft of it’s category at 210kts as its top speed.

Best Choice for Aviation Schools

More aviation flight schools are using the Cirrus SR22 for student pilot because of the power and safety. In 2003, engine models for the earlier version of SR22 were not yet equipped with Avidyne Entegra for primary flight display. It is now the standard. In 2008, the designers from Cirrus and Garmin integrated their ideas and came up with a new kind of cockpit called the Garmin Perspective that became an option in the Cirrus aircraft.
Coast Flight Training, the only Cirrus Training Center in San Diego, offers training in the Cirrus SR22. Grab this opportunity of flying the latest SR22 aircraft on the aviation market and Learn to fly at Coast Flight Training.

VA Approval

Department of Veterans Affairs

The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has approved Coast Flight Training and Management as one of the few entities allowed to receive free funding for military veterans who want and qualify to become pilots.

Flight training at Coast can now be funded for military veterans in a similar way to VA benefits to attend college. In recent years, Congress has approved flight training as a vocational program that qualifies for VA support.

VA will cover 60% of a qualified individual’s flight and instructor costs during the instrument and commercial phases of training and 100% of the written exam and check ride fees. Additionally, Coast Flight Training received a special waiver, which allows for more costs to be covered than is standard. This special waiver was approved given Coasts state of the art fleet infrastructure and academic standards. Students have the option of training in advanced aircraft such as the Cirrus SR20 and SR22 models.

Transfer to Coast Flight Training from another program or school is very easy. Course work and training already complete shall be recognized as part of our program requirements.

If a student is called back to active duty or encounters personal reasons for suspension of training VA benefits will not be taken away. Training can resume anytime without any loss of the student’s VA benefits.

If you are a VA beneficiary or know someone who is, and are interested in learning more about this program, please visit our website or contact our student concierge.

www.iflycoast.com
858-279-4359

Coast Flight Training – Free 10 minute test Program

Learn the value of a Full Motion Flight Simulator with Coast Flight Training’s new Full Motion Flight Simulator. Experience the program for free in 10 minutes.

Flight Simulator

Flight Simulator Programs include:

1) 1 Day Currency Training

2) Emergency Procedures

3) Instrument Training

4) Instrument training in support of  private/instrument pilot ratings to reduce cost of certification

5) Partner in command course

These Simulator Programs were designed by Jeff Bushnell, a Retired  Air Force Colonel who’s 25 years in Air Force training and a background on C141 instruction and Flight Examination.

jeff

Schedule a flight, email us at info@iflycoast.com or call us 858-279-4359.

Mountain Flying Tips

Mountain Technique
1. Canyon & Drainage Routes
-Fly the windward side, never up the middle of a canyon.
-Scan for opposite direction traffic.

2. Ridge/Pass Crossing
-Terrain Clearance: at least 1,000 feet AGL.
-Always identify your “escape” paths as early as possible.
-Approach at 45 degrees; exit at 90 degrees.

Descent And Landing Procedures
1. Know the pattern or approach track for the destination field.
2. Determine a safe go-around trang for the destination. Remember, as go-around may not be possible!
3. Fly a stabilized approach at appropriate IAS.
4. Plan the touchdown at 1,0000feet from the start of useable runway.
5. CLOSE YOUR FLIGHT FLIGHT PLAN(& give a final PIREP when you do!)

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High Altitude Chamber Training

While Coast does not offer high altitude training, it is a great element to discuss while pursuing a career in aviation. This write up will discuss the basics of why high altitude training is important and what you would be learning. Topics covered during a standard course consist of Physics of the Atmosphere, Respiration/Circulation, Hypoxia/Hyperventilation, Trapped Gas Problems, Evolved Gas Disorders, Vision, and Human Factors. The altitude chamber flight profile for a standard course consists of a FAA Type I profile to 25,000′. After each person experiences his or her individual hypoxia symptoms at this altitude, descent is made to 18,000′ where they undergo a Loss of Night Vision Acuity demonstration.

Students taking an enhanced course might receive additional academics that include Spatial Disorientation, Spatial Disorientation (Detailed), Cabin Pressurization, Acceleration, and Noise and Vibration. Enhanced course students receive all the features of the Standard FAA Type I flight profile, with the addition of being given an opportunity to experience an insidious onset of their hypoxia symptoms during a slow ascent from 10K’ to 18K’. At the end of this flight, each student would receive a rapid decompression. This decompression is a very valuable and necessary experience for personnel that are currently flying pressurized aircraft, or will be in the future.

Without proper training in an altitude chamber it is impossible to determine how you will react to an in-flight situation that includes hypoxic conditions. The only place you can experience decompression, and your own unique hypoxia symptoms, is in the safe and controlled environment of an altitude chamber. No matter how many books you read that describe hypoxia symptoms, you will not be prepared or safe until you actually experience it yourself. Your TUC (Time of Useful Consciousness) following a loss of pressurization at altitudes above 35,000 feet, can be as short as 5 seconds before you pass out!!!

Altitude chamber training equips you with the knowledge and practical experience to be able to recognize and prevent unfortunate events. While this training is not easy to find because of the expensive equipment required, the University of Phoenix is one of the few that offers this valuable program.

Hypoxia: A Serious Threat to Aviation Safety

Hypoxia is the condition that occurs when the body does not obtain substantial oxygen. Lack of oxygen is one of the most dangerous conditions at high altitudes, especially when coupled with inadequate pressure and/or temperatures. When a pilot inhales air at high altitudes, there is not enough pressure to force sufficient amounts of oxygen to the lungs, causing the function of various organs, including the brain, to be impaired.

Hypoxia is difficult to detect and, unfortunately, the nature of hypoxia makes the pilot the poorest judge of when it occurs. The first symptoms of oxygen deficiency resemble mild intoxication from alcohol. Most humans are completely unaware of this state of affairs and ‘believe’ they are fully conscious, when in actual fact they are in a comatose state.

The following suggestions can prevent hypoxia from getting a foot in your door:

  1. Carry oxygen and use it before you start to become hypoxic. Measure your oxygen needs by the altimeter. Use oxygen on every flight above 12,500 feet.
  2. If you do not count on a supplemental oxygen source, do not fly above 12,500 feet. If bad weather is in your course, avoid it by going around instead of climbing to higher altitudes.
  3. Pilots who are older, overweight, or smoke heavily should limit themselves to a ceiling of 10,000 feet flying levels unless supplemental oxygen is available.
  4. Use oxygen on long flights at or above 10,000 feet.
  5. Use oxygen on night flights at or above 5,000 feet.
  6. When using oxygen breathe normally. Extremely deep oxygen breathing can also cause loss of consciousness.

Besides the aforementioned recommendations, if you want to be a modern precautionary pilot you can carry a simple electronic instrument called pulse oximeter which clips on your fingertip, measures the oxygen saturation of the blood and instantly displays it on a tiny digital screen. It works as a “hypoxia tester” and could become your inseparable ally.

 

Understanding Air Density and its Effects

Understanding air density and its effects

By Jack Williams, USATODAY.com

In simple terms, density is the mass of anything – including air – divided by the volume it occupies.

In the metric system, which scientists use, we usually measure density in terms of kilograms per cubic meter.

The air’s density depends on its temperature, its pressure and how much water vapor is in the air. We’ll talk about dry air first, which means we’ll be concerned only with temperature and pressure.

In addition to a basic discussion of air density, we will also describe the effects of lower air density – such as caused by going to high altitudes – on humans, how humidity affects air density – you might be surprised – and the affects of air density of aircraft, baseballs, and even racing cars.

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Fire Hazard in Resetting Circuit Breakers

INFORMATION BULLETIN

A Special Airworthiness Information Bulletin (SAIB) advising pilots, owners, operators, and maintenance personnel of potential hazards of resetting an opened circuit breaker on General Aviation aircraft was published on December 23, 2009, and then a revision was issued on January 14, 2010 that can be found Continue reading

Steps to Becoming a Commerical Airline Pilot

Becoming a pilot for a major airline, such as United and Northwest, takes years of hard work, dedication and perseverance.  Many aspiring pilots are under the impression, that upon completion of the Commercial license, they will be qualified to work for an airline immediately.  Unfortunately, this is not the case.  The good news is there are many different options and routes pilots may take in order to achieve their final goal. Continue reading