Category Archives: Flight Training

Congratulations Adam Vornsand and Nick Cline!

These two men have been awarded Coast Flight’s Grand Aviation Scholarships, and will now begin their career as airline pilots.

Adam and Nick, along with 23 other students, won Coast’s Ground School Scholarship, which covered the cost of their Private Pilot Ground School. At the end of the course, all 25 students took their written exam, and then those with the highest scores combined with regular participation and professionalism, were invited to interview with Coast Flight Executives as finalists. Four students made it into the interview round, and Adam and Nick were chosen as the winners.

Solar Impulse

The Pathway to Becoming Professional Pilots

Now that Adam and Nick have committed to following their dreams to becoming professional pilots, their journey is ready to begin. On May 15th, the two will interview with Envoy Air to receive their individual offers of employment before they begin training at Coast Flight. After their interviews, here’s a breakdown of what their pathway to becoming professional pilots will look like:

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Start Training for Airline Careers at Coast Flight

Adam and Nick will begin their first steps in becoming professional pilots at Coast Flight. Coast offers some of the highest quality training available and has been recognized with several awards of flight training achievements. These two will receive individualized training and education to meet their needs to succeed in the program.

Begin Employment as a Certified Flight Instructor

After receiving their Certified Flight Instructor (CFI) rating, Adam and Nick can start working as flight instructors. They’ll get paid while they work to finish their 1,500 hours required to be employable by commercial airlines. After graduating, these two will have roughly 280 hours of flight under their belt. Fortunately, with Coast, they can get paid to reach their 1,500 hour goal by working for Envoy Air at Coast Flight. All of the benefits of being employed by Envoy Air will begin as Adam and Nick help new pilots learn to fly.

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Become a First Officer at a Regional Airline

Upon completion of their 1,500 hours, Adam and Nick will be able to begin flying with Envoy Air. Envoy operates regional flights as an American Airlines subsidiary, and will give the guys an opportunity to begin flying larger aircraft with more passengers. Envoy offers an industry-leading flow-through to American, providing Adam and Nick a direct path to the career of their dreams.

Live Your Dream: Fly for a Major Airline

After three to five years at Envoy air, the guys will be able to continue their airline careers with American Airlines. In only seven years from the day they start training, they will be fully immersed in the career they’ve always wanted. Once Adam and Nick begin their careers with American Airlines, they will enter in line for seniority progression. The longer they fly, the more money they make – top pilots make over $300,000 a year to work only a few trips every month. They’ll also get to pick routes, utilize travel benefits, and enjoy seeing the word.
 
Coast is extremely happy to offer this opportunity to Adam and Nick, and can’t wait to see them progress through their airline careers.
 
Additionally, Coast is pleased to have an offer for the students who didn’t win the Grand Aviation Scholarship. For those 23 students, Coast was still able to offer them a partial scholarship to continue their flight training. If the student attended all ground school classes, he or she was offered a mini scholarship of $10,000. This amount is to be applied to his or her flight training in Coast’s Airline Direct program, and will be divided in $2,000 increments towards the Private Pilot, Instrument, Single Engine Commercial, Certified Flight Instructor, and Certified Instrument Instructor ratings. Coast flight is pleased to remain at the forefront of the flight training industry and is eager to help these students advance their careers.

U.S. Military Helicopter Pilots to train for careers with Envoy/American Airlines

Coast Flight Training is expanding from its San Diego headquarters to establish a second location for its airline flight training program in San Marcos, TX.

The new training facilities in San Marcos will focus on training U. S. Military helicopter pilots who are transitioning to in-demand careers as civilian airline pilots for the nation’s top airlines.

The U.S. airline industry is facing a critical shortage of pilots, with more than 617,000 trained pilots needed by 2035 according to studies by Boeing. Pilots earn an average of $58,000 starting salary, plus benefits including travel, climbing to more than $100,000 annually after a few years in the industry, and potentially exceeding $300,000 annually during a career.

“We are very pleased to be opening a Coast location in San Marcos, where we have been welcomed with open arms by the City, Greater San Marcos Partnership, and in particular Texas Aviation Partners. They created a very positive business environment for us to invest here, create jobs, and help veterans achieve great success for themselves and their families,” said Bryan Simmons, President of Coast Flight Training. A retired United States Marine and military flight instructor, Simmons served as Presidential Command pilot for two U. S. Presidents.

“Coast Flight’s choice of San Marcos shows the true value of our airport in our economic development effort,” said City Councilman and Airport Board Chairman, Scott Gregson. “Increased utilization of our facility and being involved with re-training our veterans to help solve a critical shortage of pilots is a

“Increased utilization of our facility and being involved with re-training our veterans to help solve a critical shortage of pilots is a win-win for everyone.”

Partnering with Envoy Air/American Airlines Group, Coast Flight Training instructors will launch the first Rotary Transition Program (RTP) class in San Marcos in early 2017, providing complete transition training of Helicopter pilots to meet FAA fixed wing requirements, along with a conditional offer of employment with Envoy/American Airlines upon successful completion of training and certification. “Envoy Air is proud to team with Coast to launch this new program in Texas, and to promote commercial aviation as a rewarding career for our U. S. Military Veterans. Coast Flight offers outstanding training and produces

“Envoy Air is proud to team with Coast to launch this new program in Texas, and to promote commercial aviation as a rewarding career for our U. S. Military Veterans. Coast Flight offers outstanding training and produces well-qualified pilots that are ready to join the Envoy/American Airlines Group team, and we welcome them to Texas,” said Ric Wilson, Vice President Flight Operations, Envoy Air.

The RTP is specifically designed to meet the needs of experienced helicopter pilots, who already have valuable skills that can quickly translate to civilian employment. After approximately 90 days of training, pilots will join the Envoy/American Airlines team, which is making the RTP possible for Veterans by providing tuition assistance and a generous hiring bonus.

Coast Flight, founded in 2008 has been one of San Diego’s fastest growing companies, three years running. Coast is a FAA Part-141 flight school and is TSA and SEVP approved to host international students. Coast is also an acknowledged leader in Cirrus training and has been designated by Cirrus Aircraft as a Cirrus Platinum Training Center.

Eight Students Receive Employment Offers to SkyWest Airlines

OTTUMWA — The Indian Hills Aviation Pilot Training Program is really taking off.

Wednesday morning, eight students enrolled in the Airline Career Training (ACT) Program received a conditional employment agreement with SkyWest Airlines after they finish their Associate of Applied Science degree.

This means that as long as students complete their program, with enough hours and flight experience, they will automatically be offered a position as a first officer at the airlines, based in San Diego, California.

“It’s basically like a gift card,” said Darren Graham, director of aviation programs and chief flight instructor at Indian Hills. “We give this to them as they go through training, and they don’t have to use it if they don’t want to, but it’s a great for students, and many are focused on going there right after the program.”

The applicants have had lots of training and interview practice up to this point. On Saturday, recruiters from SkyWest conducted interviews with the potential students. They awarded conditional job offers to students with outstanding interviews, high test scores and other criteria.

Graham believes this partnership with SkyWest is extremely valuable.

“We hope this program will attract new students to the industry; just like in any field, students go through all of the training then get experience, but when it’s time to interview, 50 percent don’t get hired,” said Graham. “We want to change that.”

This is the first year that the ACT program has been on the Indian Hills campus. ACT started a year prior via the Coast Flight Training in San Diego.

Graham thinks this program will bring a new sense of professionalism to the aviation program.

“This will raise the bar for our program — it’ll bring a whole new level of professionalism and safety — students are not only representing themselves and Indian Hills but they will be a representative of SkyWest Airlines and the ACT program,” said Graham.

Thatcher Carel, Kasey Murphy, Luis Zelaya, Brennan Parker, Levi Riddick, Aaron Riche, Tim Menninga and Robert Dodd were all conditionally given offers through the program.

Indian Hills flight instructor Michael O’Connor was conditionally accepted into the SkyWest Bridge program. The purpose of this program is to help bridge the gap between completion of CFI certification and building the minimum ATP qualifications as a pilot at SkyWest Airlines.

The SkyWest aircraft participants will fly 65-80 people. For more information on the ACT program, contact Graham at 641-683-4254.

Top 10 Pilot Apps You Need to Know About

From smartphones and laptops to e-readers and tablets, personal computing devices are more advanced than ever, with applications that can do practically anything – including apps that make flying safer, simpler, and more convenient for pilots. There are even applications that help pilots to connect with other pilots. If you’re curious which applications are most useful for pilots, look no further. The following list covers the top 10 apps ever pilot needs to know about.

1. AeroWeather Pro

1) AeroWeather Pro


This app by Lakehorn AG allows pilots to check weather conditions and forecasts at their destination prior to takeoff. You can see everything from visibility to wind speed to runway conditions in one place.

2. Air Navigation Pro

2) Air Navigation Pro


Xample Sarl developed this app to assist pilots in their efforts to plan a flight with an interface that looks and feels like the instruments of a cockpit.

3. Airports

3) Airports


Peter Lundkvist developed this application to give pilots everything they need to know about their destination airports before taking off, including NOTAMs, runway data, weather conditions, and more.

4. CloudAhoy

4) CloudAhoy


This app from CloudAhoy, Inc. allows pilots to use the GPS receiver on their iPad to record flights and retrieve the data later on from any location. It’s the ultimate debriefing app.

5. FAA Airplane Flying Manual

5) FAA Airplane Flying Manual


Insomniac Industries put the most pertinent information from the FAA Flying Manual in one place so pilots are set up for a safe trip every time. This free app is an excellent refresher when pilots forget emergency procedures and other information in the rush of the flight.

 6) FBO Fuel Prices

6. FBO Fuel Prices

The team at GlobalAir .com developed an app that makes it easy for pilots to check the latest FBO fuel prices and ramp fee information before heading to their destination and fueling up. The app was developed to work in-flight or in Airplane Mode.

7. FlightPlan

7) FlightPlan


Jeff Cardillo’s FlightPlan – Pilot’s Toolbox tak es the guesswork out of common calculations with everything from weight and balance calculators to conversion calculators to a cutting-edge E6B slide rule computer, making calculating simple.

8. LogTen Pro X

8) LogTen Pro X:
the Pilot Logbook

Coradine Aviation Systems developed a logbook replacement app that some say is one of the greatest applications for pilots on the market today. Now those bulky, old, hard-to-use logbooks are a thing of the past.

9. WnB Pro

9) WnB Pro


This application from Angell Development LLC is the go-to tool for weight and balance calculations. Pilots receive an accurate weight and balance calculation for their exact aircraft and a warning if the inputted baggage, fuel, and passenger weights are out of the safe range.

10. Spin-A-Wind

10) Spin-a-Wind


Last but not least, this app from Len Robinson goes above and beyond the basic weather conditions to provide pilots with a more accurate picture of the crosswind, headwind, tailwind, and other conditions at the destination runway and its surrounding area.

Pilots are relying on apps to do everything in this day and age: charting their routes, viewing the pertinent weather maps, completing safety checklists, getting help with navigating, and much more. From a technology standpoint, there’s never been a better time to be a pilot.

Emergency Procedures Course Review

Over the last couple of years I have taken both Coast Flight Academy’s Emergency Procedures Course and Instrument Refresher Course. If you own / fly a SR22, and don’t get in nearly as many hours as you’d like, use your instrument rating primarily to file IFR to VFR on top when the marine layer hanging around, shoot the same approaches all the time to keep current, ever wonder about turning back to the airport on a engine failure on take off, and when should I be using the CAPS system, then I highly recommend both courses. The courses include presentation material with questions and answers followed by several hours in the Coast Fight Redbird simulator. On the simulator you will experience, practice, and learn things that are not possible in the real plane. For example, with an engine failure on take off, you can practice turning back to the airport or pulling the CAPS handle so that the reactions to these emergencies become automatic. You can fly an instrument approach into any airport under any conditions and have system failures along the way. Both courses are great for maintaining important skills and knowledge. They build confidence in your decision making process which adequately prepare you for real emergency situations.

–Tom Brotherton

 

ForeFlight

ForeFlight Mobile has released Version 4, the latest version of its popular app for the iPhone and iPad, to help guide pilots on the ground and during flights. The ForeFlight software application has been popular among pilots of small planes since its initial release, and Version 4 promises to offer even more helpful tools for flying such as a new airspaces feature, integrated FAA “green book” A/FD, navigation log, personal waypoints, plates organizer, and more. The technology isn’t perfect yet, but the latest version is a good additional resource to supplement the knowledge and on-plane tools that every pilot is working with.

The Pros of ForeFlight Mobile HD Version 4

Many pilots rave about ForeFlight for the instant access to A/FD, airport intelligence, flight planning, high quality weather and service providers, as well as its customized system for radar, satellite data and visualizing charts that assist in flight or at the airport. It offers a Download Manager that provides the latest data on a 28-day cycle, flight planning tools, and enhanced weather forecast imagery.

Version 4 does provide some striking enhancements, which are particularly helpful in the following areas:

  • Able to check airspace, fuel prices, NOTAMS, TFRs, weather, and wind aloft
  • Approved source of FAA chart supplements
  • Downloads approach plates, diagrams, IFT charts, and VFR charts for the entire U.S.
  • GPS moving map
  • File flight plan
  • Provides accurate airport information
  • Weather information on board
  • With a Bad Elf external antenna you will have GPS while in flight
  • IFR and VFR charts available
  • FBO information is available for every airport in country, it will have the contact numbers and the current fuel price.

Emergency Procedure Refresher Course

An in-flight emergency can occur at any moment. And depending on how long you’ve been flying, the skills and procedures you once learned about how to react in an emergency situation, may not remain clear in your memory years later. Even if you feel fairly familiar with emergency procedures, there is never such a thing as being too prepared for an emergency. For this reason, Coast Flight Training is offering an emergency procedure refresher course. After just one day, you will be far better off in any emergency flight situation than you were before.

The day is broken up into two hours of ground school and four hours of simulation, where you will be given the chance to react to an emergency in a very real and impacting way. The simulator time will be broken up into two lessons that airlines use to train their pilots. The course will involve both practical and real scenario lessons.

During the course, your instructor will go over routine emergency procedures, as well as abnormal procedures. You will be provided with methodology to handle any emergency in the most efficient and effective way possible.

The many benefits of a simulator course in handling emergencies include:
Inexpensive Cost. The simulator costs much less when compared to emergency training with an actual airplane.
Valuable Experience. Participants are allowed the opportunity to react to an engine failure and other hazardous situations. Participants are also able to have the experience of being in a real-time flight situation. You will learn quick decision-making skills, and have the option to terminate or avert flight.
Learning From The Past. Participants are able to experience and react to an example accident that has actually befallen other pilots. In the program, students are able to learn from their mistakes and access the procedures that would have made for a successful flight.
Memory Refresher. The course keeps skills fresh and ensures that you are adequately prepared to handle any emergency.

What Does “Roger” Really Mean?

For most of us, we learned to use the word “Roger” early in our aviation career. We learned that it simply means that we heard and understand what the other person said. We were clearly taught that it connotes no permission or authorizations. For whatever reason, we then go through our career or hobby of flying and hardly ever use that word. And we seldom hear it spoken by ATC!

So what happens when we have a problem on the airfield and we tell ATC that we need to do something and they say “Roger?” What does that mean? Let me give you a recent example.

A C-210 received ATC clearance to taxi via Taxiway Juliette and to cross Runway 1/19. En-route, the C-210 pilot advised ATC that the aircraft just blew a tire. The pilot requested to exit the aircraft to inspect the wheel. The Tower authorized the pilot’s request and asked the pilot to advise if he needed help.

At this time, a C-172 reported inbound with a request for full stop landings or touch and go’s on Runway 1. The tower cleared the C172 as requested. (Can you see the Runway Incursion scenario developing?)

The C-210 pilot came back on the frequency stating he had a wheel come apart. The Tower asked his intentions, and the C210 pilot said if he moved the aircraft it would do damage and requested to go to an FBO. (Getting to the FBO from the damaged C-210 would require a runway crossing.) The Tower responded “roger.” The pilot responded, “Thank you very much.”

The Tower then observed two men on foot walking towards the runway. The tower called the C-210 several times with no response. The Tower, after observing the men crossing the actual runway told the inbound C-172 to go around and enter right traffic for Runway 1, later changing clearance to land on Runway 5.

It appears to me that with the additional stress caused by the blown tire, when the pilot made his request to go to the FBO, he expected the Tower to give him a “Yes” or a “No”, and when the Tower replied with a simple, “Roger,” he forgot his early training that “Roger” is not an authorization — and started hiking!

Fortunately, the pilot of the C-172 executed a proper go-around and landed safely on another runway.

The Aeronautical Information Manual is the authoritative source for proper aviation communications. You might want to take an opportunity to review communication procedures in the AIM: http://www.faa.gov/air_traffic/publications/atpubs/aim/. But most of all, remember your early training – “Roger” only means that someone heard what was said; it does not give authority to do something.

Remember that crossing any runway, whether in an airplane, a vehicle, or on foot, always requires a specific authorization from ATC.

Have a safe and enjoyable Summer of Flying!

PREPARING For TAKEOFF

As senior Trevor Rogers was taxied onto the Montgomery Field runway, he took a deep breath.

“Montgomery Tower, Cirrus six-three-zero-sierra-foxtrot holding short two-eight right for an eastbound departure,” he said into his radio.

“Six-three-zero-sierra-foxtrot clear for eastbound departure two-eight right,” the tower crackled back.

And with that short exchange, Trevor was granted permission to fly the Cirrus SR-20. He leaned forward, closed his preflight checklist, and pulled onto the strip. As he began to pick up speed to prepare for takeoff, his face tensed slightly in anticipation. “When you’re taking off, it’s like, ‘Well, there’s no turning back now,’” Trevor said. “For the most part, once you’re going [on the runway], you have to get airborne. You can’t just stop and turn around.” Turning back isn’t something that Trevor would do though, not after all of his hard work. For him, earning his private pilot’s license last July was just one step in his ultimate dream of becoming a fighter pilot in the Air Force. “I’ve wanted to be in the military since I was little,” he said. “But when I was little, flying [didn’t seem like] a reality. When I actually went to the [Air Force Academy’s] summer seminar though, it became a reality.”

For a reality though, it was one that didn’t come easy. While earning his license, he had his grades to keep up and flight school, which dominated a large chunk of his time. And, since Trevor hopes to earn for a spot in the Air Force’s highly competitive Undergraduate Pilot Training (UPT) program after college, both his high school and college GPA need to be near perfect.

“It’s going to be really stressful,” he said. “I’m not going to be able to have as much fun necessarily because I’ll have a lot of work to do. It will be all worth it in the end because I’ll have a guaranteed job in the military serving my country.”

Trevor is stepping up to the challenge though. Ending the year with his GPA above a 4.0, his license gained, and even an $18,000 AFROTC scholarship, all that is left for Trevor is to keep moving forward and to keep doing what he loves—flying.

Westview High School Yearbook. Anne Yilmaz 2012

Weather Inside And Outside Of The Cockpit

In the coming weeks, pilots can expect to see mountain waves in several snowy, mountainous regions. When wind flow is perpendicular to a mountain, as the wind velocity and altitude increase during an inversion below 15,000 feet, or a stable air mass layer aloft, mountain waves will occur. These atmospheric disturbances are characterized by lenticular clouds that alert pilots to their potentially deadly presence. It’s possible to predict mountain waves and other atmospheric disturbances with a high level of accuracy, though, giving pilots a chance to decide whether or not to fly under such conditions.

How to Check for Weather Conditions Before and During Your Flight
There are a couple of ways to check the weather for disturbances such as mountain waves before you fly, mainly through observations and weather forecasts. There are also online weather resources, including the Aviation Weather Center and DUATS.

Observations:
• Metar – Airman’s meteorological reports
• Radar Summary Charts – Reports showing analyses of precipitation surface with cold fronts, warm fronts and areas of high or low pressure
• Surface Analysis Reports – Focus on areas of high or low pressure, as well as cold or warm fronts
• U.A. – Real-time reports from fellow pilots (recommended)

Weather Forecasts:
• 12/24-Hour Prognostic Reports – Show where cold fronts, warm fronts and areas of high or low pressure are going to move
• F.A. – Explains reasons for weather forecasts in different areas
• TAF’s Terminal Aerodrome Report – Provides expected future weather for area surrounding airports (not available for all airports)


Deciding Whether or Not to Fly – Know Before You Go
In addition to mountains waves, thunderstorms are also a serious danger to pilots during this time of year. You should always be ready to change your plans or land if you’re presented with scattered storms, as the pilot did on a recent SR22 flight from San Diego, CA to Sarasota, FL, which is pictured below.


The pilot used an Avidyne radio and XM Satellite Weather to predict the weather and made the important decision to land.  In order to make a proper go/no go decision, it is necessary to understand the weather and where and how it is generated, so you can effectively predict whether atmospheric changes are likely to occur in the areas where you will be flying. Pilots who are proficient at flying in different environments may also be able to take more risks, whereas inexperienced pilots are in greater danger when flying into mountain waves and other atmospheric disruptions. Pilots should always look at weather observations and forecasts before flying, recognize their personal limits and the limits of their plane, and be ready to make adjustments during the flight if necessary.