Category Archives: cirrus

CIRRUS AIRCRAFT’S SAFETY AWARD

The award was given by the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association’s (AOPA) Air Safety Institute (ASI). George Perry, ASI’s Senior Vice President, commented, “Over the past decade Cirrus has earned one of the best safety records in the industry, and we are proud to acknowledge their work.” He also shared that in working openly with its owners group, Cirrus has “brought their accident rate to less than half the
industry average.”

While Cirrus is now known for their safety via the Cirrus Airframe
Parachute System (CAPS) and Cirrus Approach systems, that has not always been the case.

The CAPS was put into place in the Cirrus SR20 and SR220 aircrafts
several years ago as a result of frighteningly high accident rates for the two aircrafts. It was revolutionizing technology, and Cirrus thought that by adding the whole frame parachute, they would be able to save far more lives.

They were right! As a result of the CAPS system, over 135 lives have been saved to date. However, this didn’t come without a huge effort on Cirrus’ side to educate its pilots.

When CAPS was first put into place, it was speculated that there was a spike in Cirrus accidents because Pilots felt more comfortable knowing they had the parachute system if anything should happen. But, as Cirrus discovered, there was a lack of knowledge regarding how to use the CAPS, which didn’t have the results Cirrus was hoping for.

After recognizing the new statistics, Cirrus knew they had to do what they could to educate pilots. The Cirrus Owners and Pilots Association worked diligently to create a system of encouraging CAPS use and celebrating pilots for using the technology, rather than questioning them every time. Additionally, Cirrus created the ‘Cirrus Approach’ safety program to integrate safety and CAPS procedures into regular Cirrus training.

As a result of the Cirrus Approach, the aircraft industry saw the decline in fatal accidents each year steadily increase. The height of the accident peak was in 2011, with 16 fatal accidents in SR20s and SR22s. By 2014, the number of fatal crashes decreased to three, which is remarkable considering the spike in Cirrus Aircraft use.

The Cirrus Approach system of encouraging pilots to “pull early, pull often” has helped the world to see the safety precautions put in place. In 2015 Cirrus’ CAPS was publicized when a pilot flying his SR22 over the Pacific Ocean was filmed using it. The pilot realized mid flight that there was a fuel tank issue, and he would have to utilize CAPS in the middle of the water. The U.S. Coast Guard caught the incident on camera, and the Cirrus Approach was proven beneficial.

The world saw CAPS in action again just months later when Bill Simon, the CEO of Wal-Mart, and two passengers were forced to deploy the parachute after losing oil pressure. This too was captured and quickly spread on social media.

These widespread CAPS success stories are just two of the numerous incidents in which the system has saved lives. By constantly placing safety at the forefront of design, and regularly training pilots, Cirrus has been able to lower the number of aircraft fatalities exponentially.

Cirrus is proud to be the first recipient of the Joseph T. Nall Safety Award, and looks forward to continuing to work on safety and innovation for the aircraft industry.

Emergency Procedure Refresher Course

An in-flight emergency can occur at any moment. And depending on how long you’ve been flying, the skills and procedures you once learned about how to react in an emergency situation, may not remain clear in your memory years later. Even if you feel fairly familiar with emergency procedures, there is never such a thing as being too prepared for an emergency. For this reason, Coast Flight Training is offering an emergency procedure refresher course. After just one day, you will be far better off in any emergency flight situation than you were before.

The day is broken up into two hours of ground school and four hours of simulation, where you will be given the chance to react to an emergency in a very real and impacting way. The simulator time will be broken up into two lessons that airlines use to train their pilots. The course will involve both practical and real scenario lessons.

During the course, your instructor will go over routine emergency procedures, as well as abnormal procedures. You will be provided with methodology to handle any emergency in the most efficient and effective way possible.

The many benefits of a simulator course in handling emergencies include:
Inexpensive Cost. The simulator costs much less when compared to emergency training with an actual airplane.
Valuable Experience. Participants are allowed the opportunity to react to an engine failure and other hazardous situations. Participants are also able to have the experience of being in a real-time flight situation. You will learn quick decision-making skills, and have the option to terminate or avert flight.
Learning From The Past. Participants are able to experience and react to an example accident that has actually befallen other pilots. In the program, students are able to learn from their mistakes and access the procedures that would have made for a successful flight.
Memory Refresher. The course keeps skills fresh and ensures that you are adequately prepared to handle any emergency.

The 2012 Cirrus Features

New Additions to the Cirrus SR22 for 2012

The Cirrus SR22 is known as the flagship aircraft from this leading manufacturer of small planes in the United States. The SR22 is seeing some exciting new additions this year, including extra seating, new appearance packages, an enhanced onboard satellite telephone system and a fully integrated communication system. It looks like 2012 is a great year to be flying one of these sleek single-engine planes.

Seating for Five

The SR22 has historically been a four-seater, but now Cirrus is offering “60/40 FlexSeating” in the back that allows for one additional person to sit comfortably. Optional seat belts also provide customized seating for one adult and two children in the rear seat. The new seating system weighs 10 pounds less than its predecessor, despite its increased capacity.

Appearance Packages

Cirrus has classed up its appearance packages to provide a sense of luxury, sophistication and style in the cockpit and rear. New appearance options range from the classic style of the Platinum Package to the modern Carbon Package, inspired by the adrenaline of flight.

New Satellite Telephone System

The on-board satellite telephone system now available for Cirrus SR22s enables both voice calls and text messaging during flights, as well as worldwide weather radar coverage. Pilots can use the same keypad that they program the GPS with to type and send text messages, making communication from the cockpit a breeze. The option is now being included as a way for passengers to stay connected en route, which is especially pertinent to business travelers, according to Matt Bergwall of Cirrus.

Perspective Global Connect™

This new communication technology for the SR22 allows pilots to communicate like never before. Having this fully integrated communication system within easy reach allows pilots to see worldwide weather reports with graphics on a screen right in front of them. The system also includes a satellite phone from Iridium® Communications that allows text messaging through the MFD and group or private calls through headsets in the cabin.

Weather Inside And Outside Of The Cockpit

In the coming weeks, pilots can expect to see mountain waves in several snowy, mountainous regions. When wind flow is perpendicular to a mountain, as the wind velocity and altitude increase during an inversion below 15,000 feet, or a stable air mass layer aloft, mountain waves will occur. These atmospheric disturbances are characterized by lenticular clouds that alert pilots to their potentially deadly presence. It’s possible to predict mountain waves and other atmospheric disturbances with a high level of accuracy, though, giving pilots a chance to decide whether or not to fly under such conditions.

How to Check for Weather Conditions Before and During Your Flight
There are a couple of ways to check the weather for disturbances such as mountain waves before you fly, mainly through observations and weather forecasts. There are also online weather resources, including the Aviation Weather Center and DUATS.

Observations:
• Metar – Airman’s meteorological reports
• Radar Summary Charts – Reports showing analyses of precipitation surface with cold fronts, warm fronts and areas of high or low pressure
• Surface Analysis Reports – Focus on areas of high or low pressure, as well as cold or warm fronts
• U.A. – Real-time reports from fellow pilots (recommended)

Weather Forecasts:
• 12/24-Hour Prognostic Reports – Show where cold fronts, warm fronts and areas of high or low pressure are going to move
• F.A. – Explains reasons for weather forecasts in different areas
• TAF’s Terminal Aerodrome Report – Provides expected future weather for area surrounding airports (not available for all airports)


Deciding Whether or Not to Fly – Know Before You Go
In addition to mountains waves, thunderstorms are also a serious danger to pilots during this time of year. You should always be ready to change your plans or land if you’re presented with scattered storms, as the pilot did on a recent SR22 flight from San Diego, CA to Sarasota, FL, which is pictured below.


The pilot used an Avidyne radio and XM Satellite Weather to predict the weather and made the important decision to land.  In order to make a proper go/no go decision, it is necessary to understand the weather and where and how it is generated, so you can effectively predict whether atmospheric changes are likely to occur in the areas where you will be flying. Pilots who are proficient at flying in different environments may also be able to take more risks, whereas inexperienced pilots are in greater danger when flying into mountain waves and other atmospheric disruptions. Pilots should always look at weather observations and forecasts before flying, recognize their personal limits and the limits of their plane, and be ready to make adjustments during the flight if necessary.

Features and Benefits of The Cirrus Perspective By Garmin

Cirrus caused a buzz in the aviation world in 2008 when the aircraft manufacturer finally launched the much-awaited Perspective. The Cirrus Perspective by Garmin is a standard cockpit. It employs many of the same underlying technologies as the G1000 system, but is designed solely for Cirrus’ specifications. It offers numerous benefits and new features that Cirrus pilots will surely appreciate.

These are the most exciting features and benefits of the Cirrus Perspective by Garmin:

  • Autopilot Control Yaw Damper: The yaw damper reduces rolling and yawing oscillations caused by Dutch roll mode, and the new version has an intuitive autopilot control system.
  • Flight Management System: The FMS in the Cirrus Perspective by Garmin is a more user-friendly version of the computer system that automatically performs many in-flight tasks.  It basically gives the pilot a keypad like your computer.
  • Flight Path Indicator: This technology provides a clear display of the path the airplane is on at any given time.
  • HSI Display: This display shows a predetermined course for the pilot, which replaces the gauges and other hardware that pilots have traditionally relied on to create a mental picture of the situation their airplane is in.
  • New Autopilot: The Garmin autopilot offers a blue level button.  The will level the wings, recover unusual attitude and provide flawless instrument approaches.
  • Synthetic Vision: This new virtual reality display system for cockpits uses 3D technology to give pilots a clearer and more insightful understanding of the environment in which they’re flying.
  • Terrain Avoidance Warning System: The TAWS is highly reliable and efficient, as it automatically warns the flight crew of potential collisions with terrain, giving the crew plenty of time to react before danger strikes.

This is truly the safest cockpit option available in general aviation!

How To Plan For Winter Flying

Winter is a popular time to travel.  Everyone wants to visit to family, friends, go skiing all in different areas of the country in a short holiday season.  Although winter weather conditions can create higher risk challenges, many pilots can’t help but to continue experiencing the wonders of aviation during the winter months.

If you plan on flying on your own this winter, you can have a safe and enjoyable experience, as long as you take a few extra precautions and spend a little more time planning.

Tips for Safe Winter Flying

  • Proper preflight planning is crucial – imagine all the possible worst-case scenarios before you head out onto the runway.  Remember that icing levels are lower this time of year.
  • Check all pilot reports before flying for icing conditions, airport closures, cold fronts, cloud locations and other issues that could affect your flight.
  • Air traffic during the holidays is often much worse than any other time of the year. Take this into consideration and allow for extra time to get to your destination.   Expect runway delays, and runway closures due to snow and ice.

  • If you are taking any passengers, make sure to brief them of potential scenarios and the potential for delays due to weather, airport closures and heightened air traffic.
  • Remember that temperatures in the atmosphere could dip as low as -30 degrees, and that turbulence is often much worse in the mountain areas that are popular winter destinations.
  • Get proper night training before flying with passengers in the wintertime, because the sun sets earlier and you may be forced to fly at night. In order to get night-current with your training, you must complete a minimum of three takeoffs and landings to a full stop at night within the past 90 days.

Preflight Checklist for Small Airplane Pilots

Before taking flight in the winter, the last precaution you must take is going through this additional pre-flight checklist for cold weather conditions:

  • Confirm that the heat works and that the heater is not leaking.
  • Check that all de-icing equipment is working properly.
  • Prepare instruments for holding.
  • Pre-check the safety kit and update the kit if anything is missing. Make sure you have a good knife, fire starters, a signal mirror and medical supplies in case of an emergency.

Understand Your Icing Charts

In order to avoid plane stalling, rolling, pitching or, in the worst-case scenario, total plane failure, it is necessary to study your icing charts before you fly if there’s any remote possibility of cold weather conditions during the course of your flight. There are several different options to help you understand what the potential for icing is. According to aviationweather.gov, there are four types of icing charts:

  • Freezing Level Graphs – These graphs show altitudes where the air temperature is freezing, and include charts and area forecasts showing freezing and moisture levels to help predict the potential for future icing.
  • Icing SIGMET Charts – A forecast tool that shows severe icing; abbreviation of Significant Meteorological Information.
  • Pilot’s Reports of Icing – This is a precise and constantly updated resource for pilots, providing accurate information about what’s happening right now in the sky. Pilots let fellow pilots know where they were flying, what altitude they were flying at, whether they went through any ice and, if so, how intense it was.
  • Supplementary Icing Information – The CIP and FIP are additional resources, but they’re only recommended for professional meteorologists.

Coast Hosting Event October 22, 2011

http://iflycoast.com/fast_planes/

Stop by Coast on October 22, 2011 and check out the latest from Cirrus and Porsche.  Sit in both cockpits and experience the power!  Limited flights available with reservations.  Event is free to attend, flights are $175.  All profits will go to Rady Children’s Hospital.

Food and drinks will be served.

Whatever The Weather

Weather in Flight

For most people, checking the weather is a simple matter of sticking a hand out the window. Cold? Wear a scarf. Raining? Get a jacket. But for pilots, the weather report is not so straightforward. Weather conditions, good or bad, have a dramatic impact on how an aircraft needs to be flown, so knowing the weather in intimate detail is an essential part of the pilot’s job; pilots must work with the weather, never against it. Coast Flight Training embraces this paradigm and therefore spares no effort to make sure pilots know how to assess and respond to various types of weather conditions.

Gauging the Weather

Weather is described in two ways: what is happening currently (observation), and what is going to happen soon (forecast). Both types of information are useful to pilots, and are equally important to know. Both are available via a variety of reporting formats.

Observation:

  • METAR: The most common source of weather information for pilots worldwide, these are issued mainly by airports.
  • Radar summary report: Information about precipitation.
  • U.A. reports: Probably the best source, these are reported by pilots in the air and give real time weather conditions.

Forecasts come through a separate set of reports, including:

  • Terminal aerodrome report (TAF): Provided by some—but not all—airports, these are predictions for the local area in the immediate future.
  • Area forecast (FA): Explains the reasons for weather conditions.
  • 12 and 24-hour prognostic reports: Predicts where pressures and fronts will move.

Stay Informed, Stay Safe

Pilots must become comfortable reading these and other weather reports so they can stay abreast of the most current situations and fly accordingly. Before flying, check these reports and make a careful “go/no-go” decision. While in the air, continue to check for updates and adjust your flight plan whenever necessary. Know your personal limits and those of the aircraft so the weather can remain a friend and not become an enemy.

The Surface Prognostic (Prog) Charts are available at the Aviation Digital Data Services

Cirrus Pre Buy Inspection And Delivery

Working with Will Dryden and Chris Krone at Coast Flight Training has been a great experience. I purchased a 2001 Cirrus SR22 that was located on the field. It was in need of maintenance which Will was very instrumental at getting it in for service. I live 1400 miles away from San Diego so logistics became a problem. Will was quick to offer one of his instructors to fly the plane to my location. Chris Krone was the pilot who flew my new plane to my location. He communicated the progress of the flight at every stop. Thanks to the exceptional customer service at Coast Flight Training the plane made it to it’s new home without any problems!

Jim McCullough
Cedar Rapids, IA

Coast Flight / Crownair Aviation A Cirrus Platinum Training & Service Center

Crownair Aviation and Coast Flight Training Join to Enhance the Cirrus Aircraft Experience

Cirrus Aircraft Names Crownair Aviation and Coast Flight Training as Platinum Partner Service and Training Centers

San Diego, Calif.; May 11, 2011. Crownair Aviation and Coast Flight Training and Management Inc. today announced their alliance as Cirrus Platinum Partners for Authorized Service and Training respectively.   The honor of becoming a Cirrus Platinum Partner is reserved for only those members of the Cirrus network who exhibit and consistently maintain the highest quality customer service, training standards and technical skills world-wide.

Both companies are located at Montgomery Field Airport (KMYF) in San Diego, CA and offer Cirrus Aircraft owners and pilots the only complete Cirrus Aircraft Partner Facility on the West Coast.

Crownair Aviation maintains Coast Flight Training’s fleet of Cirrus Aircraft and is open to the public for aircraft service, inspections, maintenance and avionics.  All airframe technicians have completed the Cirrus Initial training program, Specialized Composite Repair Lab in Duluth, CAPS Line Cutter Replacement, and AmSafe seat belt restraint training.  Crownair’s Avionic Technicians attended Garmin 1000 and Cirrus Perspective by Garmin training in Olathe.  Crownair can handle it all, from routine service such as oil changes to major repairs and engine overhauls / exchanges.  Crownair relies on Coast Flight’s expert group of instructor pilots to relocate aircraft when needed for service.

Coast Flight Training and Management Inc. is the finest and best-equipped Cirrus training center in Southern California. It counts on top tier Professional Pilot Instructors and a fleet that is composed of new and modern Cirrus SR20s and SR22s. The Cirrus is the best-selling, single engine piston in the world and features instruments and controls similar to commercial jetliners. The Cirrus Airframe Parachute System (CAPS™) provides top of the line, unprecedented safety. Coast uses a Scenario Based Training program (SBT), which enables pilot graduates from the academy to immediately enter the pilot ranks of commercial airlines. SBT is used by the military and airlines, and focuses on providing the student with the critical decision-making skills necessary to exercise the duties and responsibilities of the Pilot In Command. Using modern Cirrus aircraft and implementing SBT has proven to be instrumental in attracting customers and makes Coast Flight Training unique in its complete preparation of students.  In addition, Coast owns and operates brand new full motion RedBird flight simulator set up to train in the Cirrus platform.

“As a part of Crownair’s leadership team and a Coast Flight Training student pilot in the Cirrus SR20, I feel confident in this alliance”, says Debi Carlston, Director of Marketing of Crownair Aviation.  “Every time I fly, I feel secure in knowing that the aircraft are maintained extremely well and my instructors are top notch.”

About Crownair Aviation

Crownair Aviation has a history of exemplary customer satisfaction that spans six decades.  Crownair provides a wide range of aircraft services including a dedicated fuel station, pilot and passenger amenities, personalized concierge service, hangar space, and two class-leading maintenance and avionics service centers.  As one of the most experienced and respected names on the West Coast, Crownair has been serving the aviation community since 1951.  For more information on Crownair Aviation, visit www.crownairaviation.com or call any of our locations:

Crownair Aviation-MYF: 858-277-1453
Crownair Aviation-CRQ: 760-431-5315

About Coast Flight Training

Coast Flight Training and Management Inc. deploys its business in a state-of-the-art facility composed of six fully equipped classrooms and a large auditorium. Flying lessons are conducted in new and modern Cirrus SR20s and SR22s fleet are complemented by theoretical instruction carried out in a brand new full motion RedBird flight simulator. For more information on Coast Flight Training and Management Inc. http://iflycoast.com or call:

Coast Flight Training and Management:  858-279-4359