Blog

 

MOST POPULAR POST

MOST POPULAR POST

Flight Training
Airline Pilot Industry
Destinations
Coast Flight

As any good pilot knows, ground power is an essential part of modern flight. Ground power units are used to supply power to various aircraft while they are on the ground. The most common use for the larger power-supplying vehicles is supporting large aircraft as they are moving around the runway, such as after a landing. Ground power also helps create a low-pressure environment in which pilots in training can practice and learn the avionics of the plane before they actually fly.

A ground power unit is a may look like anything from a small box to a large truck depending on the planes it services.  It carries electric energy from a generator to a connection on the aircraft. Some airports also have the ground power built in. Ground power allows aircraft systems to be used without depleting the battery, so new pilots can train without the pressure of flying and make sure they’re comfortable with the plane and all of its instruments before ever taking it into the sky.

The Benefits of Ground Power

  • Chair flying offers the best opportunity to get familiar with avionics
  • Highly efficient training aid
  • At Coast there are No additional fees charged for this service
  • Provides full usage of all the plane’s instruments
  • Resource for students to effectively learn proper avionics techniques
  • No pressure to perform because the airplane is on the ground

Chair flying lets new pilots get familiar with the avionics of the aircraft. This is because the actions of the student’s body while sitting in the cockpit and envisioning flight help to develop muscle memory. Chair flying provides experience with GPS, frequency and different waypoint inputs. It makes lessons more productive, because once the student has become competent in the procedures, he or she is able to practice rather than just learn from a book or simulation. Students are focused on fine tuning their procedures instead of learning the procedures in a classroom.

Chair flying also provides students with practice in all the following areas:

  • Engaging autopilot
  • Locating information
  • Navigating avionics
  • Practice checklists
  • Practice procedures
  • Switching switches
  • Turning knobs

Ground power is a resource you’ll find in practically any airport these days. It helps to reduce emissions, fuel costs and noise pollution around the airports while the aircraft are circling the runway. From a student perspective, it is also the most efficient way to learn.

Boeing has declared the world economic recession all but over and issued its rosiest commercial aircraft forecast in years. The company’s pre-Paris Air Show analysis predicts a doubling of the world fleet of commercial aircraft over the next 20 years, with 33,500 aircraft selling for a total of $4 trillion. “The world market has recovered and is now expanding at a significant rate,” Randy Tinseth, Boeing’s VP of marketing for commercial aircraft, told reporters. “Not only is there a strong demand for air travel and new airplanes today, but the fundamental drivers of air travel – including economic growth, world trade and liberalization – all point to a healthy long-term demand.” Much of the growth will come from emerging markets in China, Asia, the Middle East and Latin America, while traditional markets in Europe and North America will be buying planes for fleet modernization.

Although the big buzz at Paris seems to be how Boeing will counter the multi-front assault on its single-aisle 737, Boeing says the big market for the next 20 years will be in twin-aisle long-range aircraft that will respond to the demands of globalization and trade liberalization. The wild card will be the effect of fuel supply and demand on airlines. “While passengers are getting what they want – more frequencies and nonstop service – rising and volatile fuel prices are expected to continue to challenge the industry,” Tinseth said. Boeing is debuting its 747-8 stretched jumbo at Paris, which runs June 20-26.

http://www.avweb.com/eletter/archives/avflash/1935-full.html#204836

Differences between Part 61 and Part 141 Flight schools have either or both authorizations.

Part 61 and 141 are sections of the Federal Aviation Regulations. They outline the requirements for an individual to obtain a pilot’s certificate or rating. Each section has it’s own details as to what is required during the training process which will make the candidate eligible to take their checkride. How do they differ? Part 61 is more open when it comes to the overall structure of the training timeline. Any flight instructor can train under Part 61. Given the openness of the training time line, the overall flight experience requirements are slightly higher.

To train under Part 141, a student must be officially be enrolled in a 141 course. Only schools that have been evaluated and approved by the FAA can issue these enrollments. In order for a school to be approved, it must count on a strict syllabus for the training course. The student must follow the syllabus exactly. Given the enforcement of adherence to stringent protocols, the over all experience requirements are less demanding.

The following chart depicts the comparisons for the initial Private Pilot

Flight Experience
(minimums)
Part 61 Part 141
Total Time4035
Solo Flight Time105
Solo Cross Country53
Dual Instruction2020
Night Flying33
Cross Country33
Instrument Instruction33
Cross Country Distances1 flight 100 nm distance1 flight 100nm distance
Take Off/Landings Night10 full stop10 full stop
60 days prior to flight Test33

.

While choosing, the student should analyze individual study habits and ultimate aviation goals. Benefits to doing a part 61 course mainly concentrate in the flexibility it entitles. If the student needs to skip one lesson and come back to it later or is not able to train on a regular schedule, then the right choice is part 61.

If the student’s ultimate goal is professional flying, having completed a Part 141 course may be preferred by some employers. Sometimes part 141 is a requirement if the student is using financial assistance to pay for his/her training. If the student keeps up with studies and trains on a consistent basis, Part 141 is the correct choice. At completion, either section finishes with a pilot’s certificate with same privileges. Selection depends on the form not the contents.

Weather in Flight

For most people, checking the weather is a simple matter of sticking a hand out the window. Cold? Wear a scarf. Raining? Get a jacket. But for pilots, the weather report is not so straightforward. Weather conditions, good or bad, have a dramatic impact on how an aircraft needs to be flown, so knowing the weather in intimate detail is an essential part of the pilot’s job; pilots must work with the weather, never against it. Coast Flight Training embraces this paradigm and therefore spares no effort to make sure pilots know how to assess and respond to various types of weather conditions.

Gauging the Weather

Weather is described in two ways: what is happening currently (observation), and what is going to happen soon (forecast). Both types of information are useful to pilots, and are equally important to know. Both are available via a variety of reporting formats.

Observation:

  • METAR: The most common source of weather information for pilots worldwide, these are issued mainly by airports.
  • Radar summary report: Information about precipitation.
  • U.A. reports: Probably the best source, these are reported by pilots in the air and give real time weather conditions.

Forecasts come through a separate set of reports, including:

  • Terminal aerodrome report (TAF): Provided by some—but not all—airports, these are predictions for the local area in the immediate future.
  • Area forecast (FA): Explains the reasons for weather conditions.
  • 12 and 24-hour prognostic reports: Predicts where pressures and fronts will move.

Stay Informed, Stay Safe

Pilots must become comfortable reading these and other weather reports so they can stay abreast of the most current situations and fly accordingly. Before flying, check these reports and make a careful “go/no-go” decision. While in the air, continue to check for updates and adjust your flight plan whenever necessary. Know your personal limits and those of the aircraft so the weather can remain a friend and not become an enemy.

The Surface Prognostic (Prog) Charts are available at the Aviation Digital Data Services

Valuable Training for Right-Seaters and Passengers

No matter how talented or experienced a pilot is, there is still a great need for him or her to have an alert and knowledgeable partner in command. There is always the possibility that the pilot could become incapacitated or overwhelmed during a flight due to unforeseen, dangerous weather conditions or other complications. No matter what problem arises, it is the right-seater’s duty to ensure that the other passengers and airplane are kept safe if the pilot is no longer able to do so.

The duties and necessary skills of the right-seater are more than meet they eye. For example, does he/she know what to say on a radio, or even how to operate one? How to find and activate the ELT from the right seat? Does he or she have first aid or medical training, including experience dealing with choking victims, hypoxia, carbon monoxide exposure and other flight-relevant issues? Is he or she familiar with how to steer to a CAPS-suitable area using autopilot?

For the answer to all of these questions and many more, Partner in Command training can be of invaluable assistance to any right-seater, or even a passenger. Non-pilot companions who frequently sit next to the pilot, such as spouses or other loved ones, could benefit especially from this training. It is designed to make these frequent flyers more at ease in the aircraft, teach them how to be an active participant in the flight as a resource to the pilot, and explain the availability and use of safety equipment in an emergency, including the Cirrus Airframe Parachute System (CAPS).

A few ways in which the partner in command can be of assistance include:

  • Assisting in the general safety needs of the captain, himself/herself and the passengers.
  • Acting as an extra pair of eyes to watch for bad weather, traffic or other hazards, while also assisting in radio communication and direction.
  • Helping passengers in the event of an emergency, and offering emergency parachute assistance in case the pilot is unable to do so.

In addition to our course for partners in command, Coast Flight Training offers an introductory course to help passengers excel in their ability to help. This course covers:

  • Basic pilot skills

–       Introduction to radio communications

–       Cockpit resource management

–       Flight maneuvers

  • Familiarization with the Cirrus equipment

–       Systems operation

–       GPS use, how to find useful information and autopilot management

–       Procedures for getting help and deploying the CAPS

  • Emergency procedures in the event of pilot incapacitation

In certain cases, learning what is available in these courses can mean the difference between life and death. The decision to take one of these extremely helpful courses is a no-brainer!

 

Working with Will Dryden and Chris Krone at Coast Flight Training has been a great experience. I purchased a 2001 Cirrus SR22 that was located on the field. It was in need of maintenance which Will was very instrumental at getting it in for service. I live 1400 miles away from San Diego so logistics became a problem. Will was quick to offer one of his instructors to fly the plane to my location. Chris Krone was the pilot who flew my new plane to my location. He communicated the progress of the flight at every stop. Thanks to the exceptional customer service at Coast Flight Training the plane made it to it’s new home without any problems!

Jim McCullough
Cedar Rapids, IA

Crownair Aviation and Coast Flight Training Join to Enhance the Cirrus Aircraft Experience

Cirrus Aircraft Names Crownair Aviation and Coast Flight Training as Platinum Partner Service and Training Centers

San Diego, Calif.; May 11, 2011. Crownair Aviation and Coast Flight Training and Management Inc. today announced their alliance as Cirrus Platinum Partners for Authorized Service and Training respectively.   The honor of becoming a Cirrus Platinum Partner is reserved for only those members of the Cirrus network who exhibit and consistently maintain the highest quality customer service, training standards and technical skills world-wide.

Both companies are located at Montgomery Field Airport (KMYF) in San Diego, CA and offer Cirrus Aircraft owners and pilots the only complete Cirrus Aircraft Partner Facility on the West Coast.

Crownair Aviation maintains Coast Flight Training’s fleet of Cirrus Aircraft and is open to the public for aircraft service, inspections, maintenance and avionics.  All airframe technicians have completed the Cirrus Initial training program, Specialized Composite Repair Lab in Duluth, CAPS Line Cutter Replacement, and AmSafe seat belt restraint training.  Crownair’s Avionic Technicians attended Garmin 1000 and Cirrus Perspective by Garmin training in Olathe.  Crownair can handle it all, from routine service such as oil changes to major repairs and engine overhauls / exchanges.  Crownair relies on Coast Flight’s expert group of instructor pilots to relocate aircraft when needed for service.

Coast Flight Training and Management Inc. is the finest and best-equipped Cirrus training center in Southern California. It counts on top tier Professional Pilot Instructors and a fleet that is composed of new and modern Cirrus SR20s and SR22s. The Cirrus is the best-selling, single engine piston in the world and features instruments and controls similar to commercial jetliners. The Cirrus Airframe Parachute System (CAPS™) provides top of the line, unprecedented safety. Coast uses a Scenario Based Training program (SBT), which enables pilot graduates from the academy to immediately enter the pilot ranks of commercial airlines. SBT is used by the military and airlines, and focuses on providing the student with the critical decision-making skills necessary to exercise the duties and responsibilities of the Pilot In Command. Using modern Cirrus aircraft and implementing SBT has proven to be instrumental in attracting customers and makes Coast Flight Training unique in its complete preparation of students.  In addition, Coast owns and operates brand new full motion RedBird flight simulator set up to train in the Cirrus platform.

“As a part of Crownair’s leadership team and a Coast Flight Training student pilot in the Cirrus SR20, I feel confident in this alliance”, says Debi Carlston, Director of Marketing of Crownair Aviation.  “Every time I fly, I feel secure in knowing that the aircraft are maintained extremely well and my instructors are top notch.”

About Crownair Aviation

Crownair Aviation has a history of exemplary customer satisfaction that spans six decades.  Crownair provides a wide range of aircraft services including a dedicated fuel station, pilot and passenger amenities, personalized concierge service, hangar space, and two class-leading maintenance and avionics service centers.  As one of the most experienced and respected names on the West Coast, Crownair has been serving the aviation community since 1951.  For more information on Crownair Aviation, visit www.crownairaviation.com or call any of our locations:

Crownair Aviation-MYF: 858-277-1453
Crownair Aviation-CRQ: 760-431-5315

About Coast Flight Training

Coast Flight Training and Management Inc. deploys its business in a state-of-the-art facility composed of six fully equipped classrooms and a large auditorium. Flying lessons are conducted in new and modern Cirrus SR20s and SR22s fleet are complemented by theoretical instruction carried out in a brand new full motion RedBird flight simulator. For more information on Coast Flight Training and Management Inc. http://iflycoast.com or call:

Coast Flight Training and Management:  858-279-4359

Congratulations To Coast President, Will Dryden!

Will has been approved by Cirrus and designated as a Platinum CSIP. Dedication to the CSIP program, Cirrus flight instruction, and the Cirrus brand are recognized.   As a Cirrus Platinum Partner, Will has joined an elite group consisting of only the top Cirrus Standardized Instructor Pilots that have differentiated themselves as the best in an already fantastic network of partners.

Will wasn’t just handed this title.  He has been working hard since the day he started Coast.  Last month, Cirrus sent out one of their own from Duluth, to come fly with Will.  Randi Pederson put him through a full Cirrus checkride prior to deeming him worthy of this elite title.

Even Cirrus Aircraft was quoted: “. . .Cirrus Aircraft team is truly appreciative of your dedication to the safety of the pilots of our airplanes, and are privileged to have such talented flight instructors such as yourself as a partner.”

Congratulations on achieving this distinctive title Will.  Everyone at Coast is proud to be working with you.

As a beginner pilot, it’s important to develop good habits right from the get-go. This is made much easier when the very first aircraft you pilot is a high-quality, technically advanced model like the one you’ll fly as a professional. At Coast Flight Training, all trainees are given access to a Cirrus aircraft—categorized by the FAA as a technically advanced aircraft (TAA)—to help students avoid having to re-learn basic techniques, as they would have to do if they started on an inferior aircraft.

But what makes the Cirrus worthy of a TAA title? A TAA is equipped with, at least, a moving map display (to communicate real-time flight information to passengers using information from the navigation system), an IFR-approved GPS navigator and an autopilot (a mechanical, hydraulic or electrical system to guide a vehicle without human assistance). With these tools, a pilot can be more aware of his or her location, the terrain, weather and traffic in the area. Moreover, built-in redundancies in a TAA ensure that if one system fails, there is a second on hand to pick up the slack. In the Cirrus, a specialized avionics system in the cockpit keeps all this data organized and easily accessible by the pilot at all times via two displays: the Primary Flight Display (PFD) and the Multifunction Display (MFD). The MFD shows a range of useful information, including the following:

The moving map
Terrain
XM Weather
Traffic
Engine instrumentation
Checklists
Airport Information
XM Radio (when workload is low in cruise)
EVS Infrared Vision

In such a versatile and high-performing aircraft, passengers, crew and cargo stand a better chance of a safe, successful flight. Coast Flight trainees have access to all this technology right from the beginning—a unique experience for student pilots in San Diego that they can get only at Coast. Additionally, the entire Cirrus Transition Course can be completed in only 10-12 hours, which is easily manageable in a weekend!


Coast Flight Training welcomes our newest Cirrus to the fleet. N788JN is a 2004 Cirrus SR20 that comes with WAAS and Traffic system upgrades. The aircraft was bought in Oregon and will be delivered next week.

As you can see on the Multi Function Display a strong cold front was approaching Aurora State Airport when Will took the airplane for the test flight. All he said was “this is not San Diego weather for sure!” Winds were 170@17 gusting 33kts, Moderate Turbulence and rain really starting to come down hard! Besides the nasty weather the plane flew flawless and will be an amazing addition to the Coast Flight Training Fleet!