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In a cooperative  effort to boost the pilot population and to spread the wonder and joy of experiencing flight, the Experimental Aircraft Association with pilots, companies, governments and organizations around the world  declared May 15 2010 as International Learn to Fly Day.

Learn to Fly

Coast Flight Training is proud to take part in this glorious celebration of aviation and will have pilots on standby all day for introductory flights.

A few weeks ago I visited 8 flight training centers in San Diego Southern California (SoCal) area. I wanted to get my private pilot’s and IFR certification at a sound school and, at the same time, to have the opportunity to enjoy training in modern, safe and reasonably new aircraft. Unfortunately these requirements were hard to meet given the fact that most schools are equipped with 20 to 30 year old aircraft, mainly Cessnas 172.

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Topics covered during the Standard Course consist of Physics of the Atmosphere, Respiration/Circulation, Hypoxia/Hyperventilation, Trapped Gas Problems, Evolved Gas Disorders, Vision, and Human Factors. All academics are taught in the morning followed by a lunch break.  The altitude chamber flight profile for the Standard course consists of a FAA Type I profile to 25,000’. After each person experiences his or her individual hypoxia symptoms at this altitude, descent is made to 18,000’ where they undergo a Loss of Night Vision Acuity demonstration.  This is followed by descent to ground level, a question and answer period, and the presentation of certificates.
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Coast Flight Training

Media Contact: Nate Cole‐Daum, Nyhus Communications LLC for Coast Flight Academy, (206) 323‐3733, nate@nyhus.com

Coast Flight Academy earns FAA/DHS approval to train international pilots

First allinclusive commercial pilot program to fully integrate scenariobased training

SAN DIEGO – March 25, 2010 – Coast Flight Academy, San Diego’s only Cirrus training center to use the advanced avionics of the Cirrus Aircraft in its program, has now been approved by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) to train international student pilots using the sophisticated scenario‐based training (SBT) model in its certification courses.

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Coast Flight Training has added two new aircraft to the fleet!

N382CP: Cirrus SR20, 2007

N382CP: Cirrus SR20, 2007

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Hypoxia is the condition that occurs when the body does not obtain substantial oxygen. Lack of oxygen is one of the most dangerous conditions at high altitudes, especially when coupled with inadequate pressure and/or temperatures. When a pilot inhales air at high altitudes, there is not enough pressure to force sufficient amounts of oxygen to the lungs, causing the function of various organs, including the brain, to be impaired.

Hypoxia is difficult to detect and, unfortunately, the nature of hypoxia makes the pilot the poorest judge of when it occurs. The first symptoms of oxygen deficiency resemble mild intoxication from alcohol. Most humans are completely unaware of this state of affairs and ‘believe’ they are fully conscious, when in actual fact they are in a comatose state.

The following suggestions can prevent hypoxia from getting a foot in your door:

  1. Carry oxygen and use it before you start to become hypoxic. Measure your oxygen needs by the altimeter. Use oxygen on every flight above 12,500 feet.
  2. If you do not count on a supplemental oxygen source, do not fly above 12,500 feet. If bad weather is in your course, avoid it by going around instead of climbing to higher altitudes.
  3. Pilots who are older, overweight, or smoke heavily should limit themselves to a ceiling of 10,000 feet flying levels unless supplemental oxygen is available.
  4. Use oxygen on long flights at or above 10,000 feet.
  5. Use oxygen on night flights at or above 5,000 feet.
  6. When using oxygen breathe normally. Extremely deep oxygen breathing can also cause loss of consciousness.

Besides the aforementioned recommendations, if you want to be a modern precautionary pilot you can carry a simple electronic instrument called pulse oximeter which clips on your fingertip, measures the oxygen saturation of the blood and instantly displays it on a tiny digital screen. It works as a “hypoxia tester” and could become your inseparable ally.

 

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Fog? No Problem!

Did you know that Coast Flight Training offers a 10 Day IFR Course?  In 10 short days, training with our highly experienced CFIs, you can earn your instrument rating and say goodbye to the San Diego morning fog layer… and hello to freedom!

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Understanding air density and its effects

By Jack Williams, USATODAY.com

In simple terms, density is the mass of anything – including air – divided by the volume it occupies.

In the metric system, which scientists use, we usually measure density in terms of kilograms per cubic meter.

The air’s density depends on its temperature, its pressure and how much water vapor is in the air. We’ll talk about dry air first, which means we’ll be concerned only with temperature and pressure.

In addition to a basic discussion of air density, we will also describe the effects of lower air density – such as caused by going to high altitudes – on humans, how humidity affects air density – you might be surprised – and the affects of air density of aircraft, baseballs, and even racing cars.

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Coast Flight Academy is excited to announce that we have the I-20 document capabilities!

This means that we are, now, able to flight train international students, from all over the world, in our Professional Pilot Program.

The I-20 is a document through which the Student Exchange Visitor Program (SEVP) and U.S authorities differentiate between individuals who are in the United States for legitimate academic pursuits, and those who are not.

Coast Flight Academy is the only Cirrus Training Center in San Diego and we offer one of the best pilot training environments in the world so students can prepare themselves for a career in the aviation industry. Students enrolled in Coast Flight Academy’s Professional Pilot Program will receive all of their licenses/ratings, including Commercial Multi-Engine, in a matter of only 9 months. Furthermore, students will have the opportunity to experience flying in every imaginable weather condition, fly in some of the busiest airspaces in the world, learn from Cirrus certified instructors and fly to a wide variety of airports in places such as Las Vegas, Tahoe and even Mexico http://iflycoast.com/destinations/.

Today is the time for you to take the step to realize your vision… and begin a new career path that will take you to new heights. If you or someone you know is interested in the Coast Flight Academy’s Professional Pilot Program. Contact us today as enrollment is limited, 858-279-4359.

For more information about the I-20 and the Visa process, please check out http://iflycoast.com/professional-pilot-training/

Notice Number: NOTC2092

In an effort to reduce pilot deviations in the Washington DC Special Flight Rules area, the FAA now has a regulatory training requirement for any pilot flying VFR within a 60 nautical mile radius of the Washington, DC VOR/DME. (more…)