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Recent Boeing projections show that the world will need to produce twice as many commercial pilots over the next 20 years.

Concerns are mounting in the wake of a recent announcement revealing an unprecedented pilot shortage. According to yearly projections from Boeing (NYSE: BA) for pilots and technicians, the world’s commercial aviation fleet is expected to double over the next 20 years. This will drive a demand for 790,000 pilots, a staggering number who need to be trained and ready to fly a commercial airliner to keep up with the growth.

The result is the greatest demand for pilots in the past decade of Boeing’s annual projections. The prognosis has industry-wide implications in a world where air travel is booming. “Despite strong global air traffic growth, the aviation industry continues to face a pilot labor supply challenge, raising concern about the existence of a global pilot shortage in the near-term,” said Keith Cooper, vice president of Training & Professional Services, Boeing Global Services. “An emphasis on developing the next generation of pilots is key to help mitigate this.”

 

Close on the heels of the announcement, Coast Flight is uniquely positioned to answer such pilot shortages. Coast’s Airline Career Training (ACT) program outputs new aviators who are career-ready in just 21 months. Through ACT, Coast offers a combination flight training and college degree program that has successfully output graduates into major airline career paths, time and again.

Boeing Forecasts Significant Pilot Shortage at a 10-Year High

By partnering with large airlines such as Envoy Air and American Airlines, Coast can take students from an empty log book to a career as an airline pilot. Program participants receive conditional job offers, allowing most graduates to step into a career with significant earning potential, right out of training. With over 300 conditional job offers accepted by Coast graduates, the ACT program has seen tremendous success. And with the option to continue online learning after becoming a career pilot, the potential for advancing in education follows students, wherever they land.

Boeing Forecasts Significant Pilot Shortage at a 10-Year High

According to Bryan Simmons, president of Coast Flight, “It’s all about who you know. Our strategic partnerships offer our students the connections they need to help them go from zero to hero in a very short time.”

Benefits of Becoming a Pilot

Dan Verda, Director of Operations and General Manager, Coast Flight Training RTP Facility, San Marcos TX

I am proud to announce that Coast Flight Training has added two new partner airlines to their Rotor Transition Program: Mesa Airlines and SkyWest Airlines. Adding these two, along with our current partner, Envoy Air, brings us to three regional carriers that we service with our world-class training program!

Benefits of Becoming a Pilot
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Coast’s Rotor Transition Program, with locations in San Diego, California and San Marcos, Texas is an accelerated program designed to get former military helicopter pilots the fixed-wing qualifications and flight time they need to qualify for jobs as First Officers with our partner airlines. Each person attending our program receives a tailor-made program that fits their needs based off of the amount of rotary and fixed-wing time that they already have. The ultimate goal: a job as First Officer at one of our premier partner airlines!

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Coast Flight Training started the country’s very first rotor transition program back in the summer of 2016, and since opening its San Marcos, Texas location in January of 2017, has put over 300 people through training and into seats with regional carriers.

If you’re a military, former military, or civilian commercial helicopter pilot, all you need to qualify is your commercial rotorcraft helicopter certificate, a 1st class aeromedical certificate, and 750 flight hours in rotorcraft to qualify for the restricted ATP.

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We’re excited to have Mesa and SkyWest aboard as our new partners, and we’re excited to continue to provide quality service to all our partner airlines as we continue to grow this program across the country and provide job opportunities to helicopter pilots nation-wide.

If you’re interested in a career with the airlines and think you qualify, feel free to reach out to me on LinkedIn, contact Coast Flight Training’s recruiting at 858-279-4359, or check out our website at www.iflycoast.com.

From the Marines to Coast Flight Training to a First Officer at Skywest Airlines

1. How did you first hear about Coast Flight?
I attended a Marine Corps Inactive Ready Reserve Muster held at PETCO Park.

2. Why did you choose Coast Flight?
Coast Flight allowed me to use my GI Bill to pay for flight training which made my dream a realistic prospect.

3. What are some of your favorite experiences you’ve had at Coast?
My favorite experiences were the times where I had the most trouble. My entire private pilot training was nothing but failure after failure after failure. I never once thought that I didn’t have what it took. I knew that I just needed more time. I was blessed to have instructors who never gave up on me and those experiences are the ones that taught me the most important lessons about perservence.

4. What are some of your favorite experiences you’ve had flying?
I got my CFII in September of 2016 which was perfect timing for the wettest winter I have experienced in San Diego. During that time, all of the instrument flying that I got a chance to do was the most exhillerating experiences I’d had to that point. It not only put my skills to the test but it also allowed me to train my instrument

4. What are some of your favorite experiences you’ve had flying?
I got my CFII in September of 2016 which was perfect timing for the wettest winter I have experienced in San Diego. During that time, all of the instrument flying that I got a chance to do was the most exhillerating experiences I’d had to that point. It not only put my skills to the test but it also allowed me to train my instrument students to the highest levels by incorporating scenario based training and enhanced weather awareness.

students to the highest levels by incorporating scenario based training and enhanced weather awareness.

Also, I flew to a little airport in Pismo beach with my best friend (who I happened to be giving instruction towards his MEI). We got some beach cruisers at the FBO and rode into town to have burgers at a local spot before flying back.

5. What are you most excited about with SkyWest?
I want to change people’s lives. It’s the little things that matter when it comes to customer service and I want to be the guy that creates a positive and lasting impression on someone. I want people to be as excited about flying as I am.

6. How was your transition from student to instructor at Coast?
In my experience, the transition happened over the course of about 8 months. From the time I had my instrument rating and I started getting halfway decent at flying, I spent a lot of time teaching people what I had learned. I led study groups and even flew with other students well before I become an instructor. I eventually got my Ground Instrutor Certificate and was actually hired as a ground instructor teaching 3 hour or more classroom lectures in addition to one on one sessions. When it was time to take my CFI checkride, I was already an instructor. I believed in myself, I just had to make the examiner believe.

7. Do you have any advice you’d share with prospective pilots?
I would urge pilots at any level to never stop learning. Spend time actively trying to find ways to challenge yourself so that you can get better. It will make you a more proficient and safer aviator.

8. Tell us about your time in the military. What branch and rank were you?
I was a corporal of Marines and was fortunate enough to be able to serve overseas in Okinawa, Afghanistan, Kuwait, and Bahrain over a 4 year period. My job title was Bulk Fuel Specialist so I built portable fuel farms and dispensed JP-8 for both ground and air operations.

9. How did you get into photography? What’s your inspiration?
I was always into looking at things. It sounds weird, but if you stare at anything long enough your imagination can take you to some interesting places. You can build stories and worlds in your mind. It’s uncanny, but I’ve been doing that for years and my outlet for my imagination was writing and playing music. Well anyway, I guess I got kind of good at iphoneography (which is like a real term these days). People would compliment my instagram stuff more and more often. It was fun for me, but mostly trivial. Then one day, a fellow student at Coast handed me a DSLR and told me to learn how to use it. IT changed my life. Instantly after looking through that glass I knew that I could actually create art! I was stunned by how much better a photograph could actually look. I guess my goal with photography is share what I see when I view the world. A photographer(s) that stands out to me as a primary influence is John and Debora Scanlan.

In March 2018, Coast Flight welcomes 2 Tecnam P2006T Twin aircraft to our fleet.

These aircraft will allow us to offer more flight times and a quicker way to move through multi-engine ratings. Additionally, the Tecnam is ideal for flight training with the advanced Garmin G950 IFR avionics. These aircraft are fuel efficient and have upgraded avionics for ease and comfort. Start your multi-engine flight ratings today!

Coast Flight Adds Tecnam P2006T
Coast Flight Adds Tecnam P2006T

Here’s what you should know about the Tecnam P2006T

Coast Flight Adds Tecnam P2006T

Exterior and Interior

Equipped with four passenger seats and fully retractable landing gear, this high-winged aircraft has high quality cabin visibility and room for passengers and luggage. The aluminum aircraft is spacious and light, resulting in a high payload to total weight ratio. The fuel tanks are onboard the engines, and each hold 26.4 gallons of fuel.

These aircraft come with upholstered seats and headrests with vertical adjustment capabilities to allow comfort for pilots and passengers of all sizes. There is one vent outlet per passenger (4 total), and both heating and defrost systems to keep the cabin that perfect temperature and avoid frost on the windows.

Coast Flight Adds Tecnam P2006T
Coast Flight Adds Tecnam P2006T

Weight and Dimensions

Each Tecnam P2006T is 8.46 feet high by 28.5 feet long, with a wingspan of 37.4 feet. The cabin width is 4 feet, and it comes with room for four passengers. These Tecnams are designed for a maximum takeoff weight of 2,712 pounds, allowing for baggage up to 176 pounds and a useful load of 906 pounds. These aircraft are spacious enough to fly comfortably, and with the fuel storage ability, you can fly across the
country in them.

Engine and Performance

These aircraft are ideal for general aviation airports and transportation as they use minimal fuel. They can travel 669 NM at a time, and are great for VFR day and night flights, as well as IFR training. The have a max cruising speed of 150 KTAS and run best on Mogas and Avgas fuel, of which they only consume 9 gallons per hour.

Coast Flight Tecnam P2006T Cockpit

Avionics

All two of the new aircraft are less than 5 years old and come with Garmin G950 IFR avionics upgrades. This upgraded system includes G950 Integrated Flight Deck System, GDU-1040 Primary Flight Display and Multi-Function Display, GDC-74A Air Data Computer with Oat Probe, and GRS-77 AHRS. It also comes with the GMU-44 Magnetometer, Digital Audio Panel with Marker Beacon Intercom, Mod S Transponder, and Back Up Instruments. These aircraft also have integrated control which is displayed on PFD.

These new additions to the Coast Flight fleet are ready to take you to the sky. We have extended our booking capabilities and would love to get you scheduled for your first flight in a Tecnam P2006T today!

Coast Flight Adds Tecnam P2006T

In the aviation industry there are a handful of milestones that every pilot looks forward to. Once you begin flight training, the first one of these is your first solo flight. But how do you celebrate such a big accomplishment?

There are two main ways of celebrating a pilot’s first solo flight in the industry. One tradition includes cutting the back of the pilot’s shirt off to symbolize cutting the end of the student “riding the instructor’s coattails.” While this is a very visually symbolic way to celebrate, and it leaves the pilot with a keepsake to look at in the future, fewer flight schools are staying with this tradition and more are switching over to the Solo Dunk.

At Coast Flight, we celebrate every first Solo Flight with a Solo Dunk. Everyone in our facility will gather around the pilot, taking pictures and videos while the pilot’s flight instructor has the honor of dumping a bucket of water on the pilot’s head. The pilot is then congratulated by the entire Coast community and has a good laugh while rewatching the videos.

2018 Coastflight Scholarship Update

This month, Coast had two very special Solo Flights take place, and they were quickly followed by the Solo Dunk celebration: Adam Vornsand and Nick Cline. Adam and Nick both won scholarships through Coast Flight at the beginning of the summer, and they’ve been working hard with their instructors to learn the ins and outs of flight and aircraft. Both pilots successfully took their first Solo Flights in a Piper Archer, and now have one major milestone checked off their list, with many more to come!

For many, being an airline pilot has been a lifelong dream. For others, it could be a new career path. Regardless of how long you’ve had the dream of flight, you can now experience the incredible benefits of becoming an airline pilot. There is a sense of pride and adventure that comes along with flying. As a pilot, you have the freedom to travel the world and fly for airlines all over.

You’ll also belong to an elite club of people who have the skills to fly. In the United States, only about 0.2% of the population has any type of Pilot’s License. Pair this fact with the increasing demand for world travel, and it’s easy to see that there are endless opportunities for career growth and financial gains as an airline pilot.

Start Training for a $7 Million Career

At the start of your career as an airline pilot, you’ll be making well over $50,000 per year. After the first year, you’ll now receive a retention bonus of $20,000. Within 4 years you’ll upgrade to a Regional Airline Captain with a paycheck of $70,862 per year. Immediately following this upgrade, you’ll receive another retention bonus of $7,500. Once you have accumulated experience and flight time you can join a major airline where staring salaries are $157,939 per year! Upgrading to a Captain for major airline means annual salaries of over $300,000. These pay increases are expected to grow with the looming pilot shortage forecast on the horizon.

airline pilots salary chart
airline pilots salary chart

Join Coast Flight’s Airline Training Programs to Kickstart Your Career

Traveling the World is a Priceless Experience.
Do it Without Paying the Price of an Airline Ticket.

No two workdays will be the same for you. You could start your morning in Los Angeles, CA, and end your day in Tokyo, Japan. Since you’ll be staying the night in a new city, and your hotel expenses will be covered by the airline, you can explore a new city and experience a different culture. You’ll have the opportunity to see the world while getting paid.

If you want to travel while off the clock, you and your immediate family will enjoy free seats on any open flight. You’ll also have the benefit of discounted tickets for extended family, or busy flights you need to reserve a seat for.

As part of Coast Flight’s partnership with Envoy Air, our graduates will enjoy the benefits of the largest travel network in the industry. Envoy and American employees can travel on any Envoy, American Airlines, or oneworld alliance aircraft free of charge for both Coach and First Class seats on open flights. These standby perks apply to you, your spouse, your children, and your parents.

“With more than 6,700 daily flights to over 330 destinations worldwide,
your travel possibilities are only limited by your imagination.”

Receive Full Benefits to Keep You and Your Family
Healthy and Happy for Your Travels

airline pilot benefits

Full Health
Benefits

airline pilot matching

401(k) Retirement
Matching

airline pilot sick time accrual

Paid Vacation &
Sick Time Accrual

The airline industry offers a competitive benefits package, including full health, vision, and dental coverage. You’ll also receive company matched 401(k) retirement contributions. For those that continue through Envoy’s American Airlines Pipeline Program, there is also an opportunity for American Airlines Group profit sharing.

Learn More About the Benefits Coast Graduates Receive with Our Partners

New Pilot Needs by Region
2016 – 2036

airline pilot count
airline pilot count

There’s an Unprecedented Pilot Shortage Which
Secures Your Career with the Airlines

Boeing’s 2016 Pilot and Technician Outlook Report suggests that the airline industry will need to hire about 617,000 new commercial airline pilots between 2016 and 2035. The demand for pilots has neve been so high, and as a result, airlines are fighting to train and retain the best and brightest pilots around. That is great news for you! As a pilot, you’ll begin receiving pay, bonuses, and benefits that haven’t been seen in the airline industry until now. As long as you stay on you career path, you’ll have a stable, flexible career to grow with.

Coast Flight

Complete Your
Flight Training

Envoy Air

Build Seniority While
Flight Instructing

American Airlines

Direct Flow with No
Additional Interview

Coast Flight’s Partnership with Envoy Air Leads to
Flow Through to American Airlines

Coast Flight has partnered with Envoy Air, an American Airlines subsidiary, to ensure our students receive the greatest benefits and job security in the industry. Students in the Airline Direct (AD) or Airline Career Training (ACT) Programs can build seniority for Envoy while they flight instruct to build their 1,500 hours of flying time. Once there, they’ll enter Envoy’s Pipeline program with flow through to American Airlines, allowing them to join the top paying company in the industry.

Begin Your Airline Pilot Career With Coast Flight

Just when we thought we had seen it all from Cirrus, they came out with an aircraft that seems like a dream: the Cirrus Vision Jet. The Vision Jet is a one of a kind personal jet that doesn’t fit any of the pre-existing jet categories. It was built with the Cirrus pilot in mind, created to burn about half the fuel of a light jet, and be cheaper than the single-engine turboprops that can’t fly as high or fast. The Vision Jet is a personal jet created to need no flight crew; if you’re a Cirrus Pilot, it’ll take almost no time to start flying your own Vision Jet.

Cirrus Vision Jet

The Vision Jet was created to almost mirror the Cirrus piston aircraft, with switches in the same locations. It also includes the signature Cirrus Airframe Parachute System (CAPS), which is a first for a turbine-powered aircraft. While this is one of the smaller personal jets, the Vision Jet has plenty of room for up to 7 people and their baggage. Because Cirrus wants to make the perfect jet for their customers, the seating plan is completely customizable, so you can have more room for passengers or luggage, depending on what works best for you. The large windows let in a lot of natural light, and there is plenty of headroom in the cabin for everyone to relax and enjoy the flight.

Weight and Dimensions

SF50 Carbon Aesthetic

The Cirrus Vision Jet is on the smaller side of personal jets, with a length of 30 feet 7 inches and height of 10 feet 9 inches. The cabin width is just over 5 feet and roughly 4 feet tall. The wingspan of the Vision Jet is 38 feet 7 inches. This new personal jet has plenty of room for all of your belongings, with a maximum ramp weight of 6,040 pounds and takeoff weight of 6,000 pounds. The jet’s basic empty weight is 3,572 pounds. The Vision Jet also gets great fuel mileage, with a maximum fuel weight of 4,900 pounds and maximum usable fuel of 2,000 pounds.

Engine and Performance

The new Cirrus Vision Jet, model FJ33-5A, is manufactured by Williams International and has a thrust of approximately 1,800 pounds. In order to take off, the Vision Jet requires 2,036 feet, and 3,192 feet to takeoff over a 50-foot obstacle. The stall speed with flaps is 67 knots, and max cruising speed is 300 KTAS, with a landing ground roll of 1,628 feet.

Cirrus Vision Jet

Features and Customization

These jets come with the following benefits as part of the standard Vision Jet: CAPS, Cirrus Perspective Touch by Garmin Cockpit, Flight Into Known Ice System, modular seating for five adults, air conditioning with climate control, 3-point crew airbag seatbelts, large windows for perfect visibility, leather interior, and 4 USB power ports. The Vision Jet fits perfectly inside the standard 40-foot hangar for easy storage.
 
Customers can upgrade their Vision Jets to include: 6th and 7th third-row seats, entertainment display, 115V AC power, multi-zone climate controls, WiFi ground links, Perspective Global Connect, dual-tone paint, enhanced interior lighting, Perspective ECS, and enhanced real-time weather radar.
 
Being part of the Cirrus Life means using your personal aircraft to better your flying experience and avoid overwhelming it with complex operating systems. That is why the Vision Jet is perfect for every Cirrus Pilot! No additional crew is required to fly the Jet, alleviating one additional stress of planning flights.
 
If you’re interested in purchasing your own Cirrus Vision Jet, Coast Flight is happy to help ensure you get the perfect aircraft! Contact us for all your flight training and management needs.

In a recent blog post, we announced that Adam Varnsand and Nick Cline won the Coast Flight Grand Aviation Scholarships. Adam was the grand prize winner, receiving a scholarship for $75,000 to cover his flight training from Private Pilot (PPL) to Certified Flight Instructor (CFI), and Nick was awarded a scholarship for 50% off his flight training costs at Coast. Since receiving the exciting news of winning these scholarships, these two young men have begun the process of joining Coast’s Airline Direct Program by interviewing with Envoy Air to receive their Conditional Offers of Employment. The two interviewed with Natalie Nielsen, Envoy’s Director of Pilot Recruitment, and David Streit, Envoy’s Pilot Recruiter, on May 15th, and are planning their training start dates.

GRAND AVIATION SCHOLARS
GRAND AVIATION SCHOLARS

We’ll be checking in with Nick and Adam throughout their time at Coast Flight to see their progress and what they’ve been able to accomplish with this amazing scholarship opportunity. However, before they even begin, we were eager to sit down with Adam and ask him a few questions about his dream of becoming an airline pilot. Here’s what he had to say:

When did you first realize you wanted to be a professional pilot?

I’ve always had a passion for flying. The first time I realized that I wanted to make flying my profession was probably in middle school. My teacher had us research careers that we were interested in for an essay and I decided to do some research on becoming a pilot. After my research, my general admiration for flight turned into my professional goal.

What has been your favorite lesson in flight training so far?

My favorite lesson so far is the lesson on weather because an understanding of weather patterns is critical for safe flight. I found it so interesting that I did more research on weather patterns and predictions to the point where, during our most recent storm, I was following along on the radar images of the storm as it moved through and I endeavored to anticipate the path of the system.

What part of your airline career pathways are you most excited about?

I’m most excited about getting my Certified Flight Instructor Rating so that I can teach other people and share my passion for flying with others. However, I also think this will be the most difficult certification to get because not only will I have to know the information, but I’ll have to know it well enough to teach others.

As you know, pilots get great travel perks. Where is the first place you want to take a vacation once you start receiving your travel benefits, and why?

As a casual history buff, I’d like to visit culturally significant, but easily accessible historical sites. I’d love to use my passion for flight to further my interests in history around the world. Eventually, I’d like to visit every one of UNESCO’s World Heritage Sites, including Machu Picchu and the Great Barrier Reef.

CF3
CF4

After answering our questions, we asked Adam to about his excitement for this new opportunity. He shared that he couldn’t wait to start training and was extremely grateful for the opportunity Coast Flight has given him. We have no doubt that Adam and Nick will bring a lot to the Coast Flight family, and we can’t wait to see them progress to their dream career as professional airline pilots.

Read how the Grand Aviation Scholarship was awarded in our previous blog.

These two men have been awarded Coast Flight’s Grand Aviation Scholarships, and will now begin their career as airline pilots.

Adam and Nick, along with 23 other students, won Coast’s Ground School Scholarship, which covered the cost of their Private Pilot Ground School. At the end of the course, all 25 students took their written exam, and then those with the highest scores combined with regular participation and professionalism, were invited to interview with Coast Flight Executives as finalists. Four students made it into the interview round, and Adam and Nick were chosen as the winners.

Solar Impulse

The Pathway to Becoming Professional Pilots

Now that Adam and Nick have committed to following their dreams to becoming professional pilots, their journey is ready to begin. On May 15th, the two will interview with Envoy Air to receive their individual offers of employment before they begin training at Coast Flight. After their interviews, here’s a breakdown of what their pathway to becoming professional pilots will look like:

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Start Training for Airline Careers at Coast Flight

Adam and Nick will begin their first steps in becoming professional pilots at Coast Flight. Coast offers some of the highest quality training available and has been recognized with several awards of flight training achievements. These two will receive individualized training and education to meet their needs to succeed in the program.

Begin Employment as a Certified Flight Instructor

After receiving their Certified Flight Instructor (CFI) rating, Adam and Nick can start working as flight instructors. They’ll get paid while they work to finish their 1,500 hours required to be employable by commercial airlines. After graduating, these two will have roughly 280 hours of flight under their belt. Fortunately, with Coast, they can get paid to reach their 1,500 hour goal by working for Envoy Air at Coast Flight. All of the benefits of being employed by Envoy Air will begin as Adam and Nick help new pilots learn to fly.

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Become a First Officer at a Regional Airline

Upon completion of their 1,500 hours, Adam and Nick will be able to begin flying with Envoy Air. Envoy operates regional flights as an American Airlines subsidiary, and will give the guys an opportunity to begin flying larger aircraft with more passengers. Envoy offers an industry-leading flow-through to American, providing Adam and Nick a direct path to the career of their dreams.

Live Your Dream: Fly for a Major Airline

After three to five years at Envoy air, the guys will be able to continue their airline careers with American Airlines. In only seven years from the day they start training, they will be fully immersed in the career they’ve always wanted. Once Adam and Nick begin their careers with American Airlines, they will enter in line for seniority progression. The longer they fly, the more money they make – top pilots make over $300,000 a year to work only a few trips every month. They’ll also get to pick routes, utilize travel benefits, and enjoy seeing the word.
 
Coast is extremely happy to offer this opportunity to Adam and Nick, and can’t wait to see them progress through their airline careers.
 
Additionally, Coast is pleased to have an offer for the students who didn’t win the Grand Aviation Scholarship. For those 23 students, Coast was still able to offer them a partial scholarship to continue their flight training. If the student attended all ground school classes, he or she was offered a mini scholarship of $10,000. This amount is to be applied to his or her flight training in Coast’s Airline Direct program, and will be divided in $2,000 increments towards the Private Pilot, Instrument, Single Engine Commercial, Certified Flight Instructor, and Certified Instrument Instructor ratings. Coast flight is pleased to remain at the forefront of the flight training industry and is eager to help these students advance their careers.

This year, Earth Day is on Saturday, April 22nd, and the airline industry has some creative ways to celebrate and contribute to the reduction of carbon emissions produced. Currently the airline industry is responsible for about 2% of global carbon emissions and that number is expected to exponentially grow, hitting 22% by 2050. As a result, the industry has recognized that is has a responsibility to keep our air clean and reduce as much negative environmental impact as possible. Here are some of the most creative ways we can see the airline industry helping keep our Earth clean:

Solar Impulse

Solar Powered Flight

The Solar Impulse was the first solar powered airplane to fly across the United States, through the night, and between continents. The First Round-The-World Solar Flight was manned by pilots Bertrand Piccard and André Borschberg, and lasted from March 2015 through July 2015. This aircraft was the first to fly completely on solar power, with absolutely no fuel, leading to a cleaner way of air travel.

The crew was the first to fly five days and five nights straight solely using solar power, setting countless records, and more importantly, setting a new challenge for the airline industry. According to Bertrand Piccard, “The problem with our society is that, despite all the grand talk about sustainable development, we are a long way from making use of the clean technologies that are already available to us. Those solutions bring opportunities to create jobs, make profit, sustain the growth of the industry, and at the same time protect the environment.” Piccard and Borschberg want the airline industry, and the world, to explore the possibilities of clean, renewable energies like solar power and get creative with the future of flight.

Low Emissions Aircraft

“Boeing airplanes use 70 percent less fuel now compared with the start of the Jet Age through technology alone,” shared Julie Felgar, the managing director of Commercial Airplane’s Environmental Strategy and Integration team. To continue increasing this percentage, Boeing has recently released its family of Boeing 787 Dreamliners.

The 787-8 and 787-9 Dreamliners are both roughly 20% more fuel efficient than the airplanes they were created to replace, while the 787-10 is 25% more fuel efficient. 787_earthblogBecause of this, less fuel is used, producing less carbon emissions into the atmosphere. Additionally, the new Dreamliner family now flies more direct routes, meaning less fuel is used to make stops along the way. The Dreamliner aircraft are also larger in space, meaning more people and baggage can fly with the same amount of fuel being used.

American Airlines is also working to reduce carbon emissions through replacing their fleet with new, more energy efficient models. Their goal is to fly the youngest U.S. based fleet internationally, and replace older aircraft which burn more fuel, produce more emissions, and have increased energy costs. Newer aircrafts are made to burn less fuel and utilize new energy technology, so the change in fleet will greatly decrease American’s contribution to carbon emissions and fuel inefficiency. American Airlines is proud to boast that they have played a key role in U.S. based airlines reducing emissions by 3.4 billion metric tons of carbon dioxide from 1978 to 2012. They’ve been at the forefront of the environmentally friendly flight industry, and plan to remain innovative and key players in the changes to come.

Pilots

Minor Changes, Major Impact

Industry leaders are making the following changes to help contribute to reducing carbon footprints:

  • Go paperless! American Airlines’ flight attendants and pilots have begun using iPads and eManuals rather than paper. This change has led to American reducing amounts of CO2 emissions by 2,100 metric tons each year due to the decrease in weight.
  • Install winglets. This is a small vertical piece added to the end of each wing, which cuts down the amount of fuel needed to fly because of the improved wing lift.
  • Taxi with one engine. There is no need to power up both engines, and utilizing one engine taxiing reduces fuel consumption significantly.

United Nations’ Civil Aviation Organization

The United Nations’ Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) met in October of 2013 and signed an unprecedented agreement to stop emissions caused by international aviation at 2020. After this, ICAO agreed that all growth must be carbon-neutral, if not carbon-negative. From 2021 through 2026, 65 countries have agreed to participate in the process of becoming carbon-neutral. Starting in 2027, participation will be mandatory for all major countries. This stands to be a long-term plan for the aviation industry to reduce its carbon emissions and contribute to the well-being of our planet.

San Marcos, TX

Address:
1837 Airport Dr. San Marcos, TX 78666
Phone: (858)279-4359
Email: info@iflycoast.com

San Diego, CA

Address:
8525 Gibbs Dr. Suite 105 San Diego, CA 92123
Phone: (858)279-4359
Email: info@iflycoast.com