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Coast Flight
Posted January 25, 2016

Coast Flight’s Airline Career Training (ACT) Program has been rapidly growing in size since its inception in August 2014. The ACT program currently has 120 actively training students, and is excited to welcome another 15 who will start in late February. The program offers participants the opportunity to earn an accredited, FAA-approved Associate’s Degree from Indian Hills Community College. Indian Hills has been ranked in the top 10 percent of community colleges in the nation, and offers online courses for ACT students to take classes while flight training in beautiful San Diego, CA.

The degree in Aviation Pilot Training can be completed while students are building their hours for their next flight rating. Once students have completed the required flight ratings, they may work as a Commercial Pilot with one of our airline partners, and continue to finish their studies online from wherever their flights may take them.

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ACT student Danny Perez shared, “This offer allows us the opportunity to gain a degree and flight train at the same time, which makes the process of obtaining a job in the airline industry much quicker. The online classes make it easy for me to keep my daily schedule and study around it. ACT has also made it easy to meet and fly with my peers. Indian Hills Community College is constantly ranked amongst the top community colleges in the nation, which lets me know I am getting a great education while I train.”

When the ACT program was first introduced, Coast was quick to make sure that they not only had a college partner to offer an online degree, but also airline partners who would help students make connections and jumpstart their careers in the airline industry. Coast has two partner airlines who allow students to join pipeline programs to becoming airline pilots. SkyWest Airlines has given all ACT students a conditional offer of employment prior to flight training in the ACT Program. Envoy Air, an American Airlines subsidiary, holds interviews with ACT students upon completion of their Instrument Rating certificate. If an ACT student is selected by Envoy, they will have a guaranteed position as a pilot at American Airlines.

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Will Dryden founded Coast Flight in 2008 and shared, “When I started the company, I always knew that combining professionalism and fun would result in the best pilots. Our job was to encourage each student’s passion for aviation to surface while we molded the best professional aviators! The idea was Over 120 Students Enrolled in ACT always to help people realize their passion for flight and start exploring the sky. We now have partnerships with two of the largest regional airlines in the United States, who represent almost 6,000 pilots, and a top rated school, which I could not be more excited about.”

The ACT Program also offers incentives for veterans, accepting up to 100% coverage for the program costs from the Post-9/11 GI Bill after Private Pilot. If students don’t have military benefits, they can get up to 100% financing and have advisors to help figure out how to make their dreams a reality.

“The ACT Program is a truly unique opportunity for our students.” added Coast’s President, Bryan Simmons, “They can get a job offer before ever starting flight training. Students also have the ability to expedite their training and degree, and get to live in the best city for flight training. Sunny San Diego allows our students to train on a more regular basis, which helps get them their ratings faster. The ultimate goal is to help them reach a career as an airline pilot, and we are happy to see that this goal is being achieved with over 120 students now in the program and well on their way to professional pilot careers.”

Pictured: Coast CFI Kristen Verdi now flying for SkyWest Airlines!

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Posted April 22, 2015

An instrument rating is an advanced type of aviation certification enabling pilots to fly rather than be grounded even during cloudy weather and other weather conditions that cause low visibility. The Instrument Flight Rules Rating (IFR) training requirements include 30 hours of pre and post flight ground school, 40 hours of instrument flight training, 50 hours of PIC Cross-Country, and the successful completion of an instrument written exam. It is an excellent addition to a private pilot’s certificate, which by itself leaves the pilot limited to flying only during Visual Flight Rules (VFR) conditions. Aside from the obvious, though, there are many additional advantages that come with an instrument rating. Here are seven good reasons why an instrument rating ultimately makes for a better pilot:
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1) Better Planning Pre-Flight

It’s typically true that a pilot with an instrument rating will be better at pre-flight planning than a pilot without an instrument rating. The training prepares pilots for alternates, deviations, hazards, fuel stops, and more.

2) Heightened Pilot’s Intuition
Pilots with an instrument rating also tend to be more forward-thinking, as opposed to less skilled pilots who are always in the present moment. Being a couple steps ahead, with split-second reaction times, is always a good thing in the sky.

3) IMC Flight Preparation
Flying inadvertently into Instrument Meteorological Conditions (IMC) can be tricky, but with an instrument rating pilots are better prepared for the unexpected limitations to their visibility due to unpredictable weather and clouds.

4) Improved Accuracy
Pilots with an instrument rating are known to possess an improved level of accuracy because IFR training gives pilots an opportunity to learn more precise flying techniques in terms of power changes, pitch, heading, altitude, and airspeed.

5) More Instrument Knowledge
Completing IFR training provides pilots with a more in-depth knowledge of the instruments and other technology in their aircraft as well, which makes them a superior pilot in a variety of circumstances.

6) Weather Predictions Become 2nd Nature
Pilots tend to improve their ability to notice and predict weather conditions once they’ve gotten an instrument rating. The required training includes a heavy focus on the ins and outs of weather reporting and weather theory, as well as exercises to build specific skills such as recognizing frontal passages, ice, thunderstorms, and more.

7) You’ll be a Traffic Pro
And finally, once you have finished your IFR training, you will also improve your ability to find nearby traffic with a high level of accuracy and understanding of the leading pilot reporting terminology.

If you’re ready to get an instrument rating in addition to your private pilot’s license, there is no time like the present. Coast Flight offers an Instrument Flight Rules Rating Program that prepares private pilots for clouds and other bad weather in an accelerated format. Pilots build their confidence in a complex and busy airspace and are only certified when they have reached an airline-standard of skill for flying in little (or no) visibility. After getting an instrument rating, pilots are also qualified to begin a commercial pilot’s certification program.

Posted March 2, 2015

From smartphones and laptops to e-readers and tablets, personal computing devices are more advanced than ever, with applications that can do practically anything – including apps that make flying safer, simpler, and more convenient for pilots. There are even applications that help pilots to connect with other pilots. If you’re curious which applications are most useful for pilots, look no further. The following list covers the top 10 apps ever pilot needs to know about.

1. AeroWeather Pro

1) AeroWeather Pro


This app by Lakehorn AG allows pilots to check weather conditions and forecasts at their destination prior to takeoff. You can see everything from visibility to wind speed to runway conditions in one place.

2. Air Navigation Pro

2) Air Navigation Pro


Xample Sarl developed this app to assist pilots in their efforts to plan a flight with an interface that looks and feels like the instruments of a cockpit.

3. Airports

3) Airports


Peter Lundkvist developed this application to give pilots everything they need to know about their destination airports before taking off, including NOTAMs, runway data, weather conditions, and more.

4. CloudAhoy

4) CloudAhoy


This app from CloudAhoy, Inc. allows pilots to use the GPS receiver on their iPad to record flights and retrieve the data later on from any location. It’s the ultimate debriefing app.

5. FAA Airplane Flying Manual

5) FAA Airplane Flying Manual


Insomniac Industries put the most pertinent information from the FAA Flying Manual in one place so pilots are set up for a safe trip every time. This free app is an excellent refresher when pilots forget emergency procedures and other information in the rush of the flight.

 6) FBO Fuel Prices

6. FBO Fuel Prices

The team at GlobalAir .com developed an app that makes it easy for pilots to check the latest FBO fuel prices and ramp fee information before heading to their destination and fueling up. The app was developed to work in-flight or in Airplane Mode.

7. FlightPlan

7) FlightPlan


Jeff Cardillo’s FlightPlan – Pilot’s Toolbox tak es the guesswork out of common calculations with everything from weight and balance calculators to conversion calculators to a cutting-edge E6B slide rule computer, making calculating simple.

8. LogTen Pro X

8) LogTen Pro X:
the Pilot Logbook

Coradine Aviation Systems developed a logbook replacement app that some say is one of the greatest applications for pilots on the market today. Now those bulky, old, hard-to-use logbooks are a thing of the past.

9. WnB Pro

9) WnB Pro


This application from Angell Development LLC is the go-to tool for weight and balance calculations. Pilots receive an accurate weight and balance calculation for their exact aircraft and a warning if the inputted baggage, fuel, and passenger weights are out of the safe range.

10. Spin-A-Wind

10) Spin-a-Wind


Last but not least, this app from Len Robinson goes above and beyond the basic weather conditions to provide pilots with a more accurate picture of the crosswind, headwind, tailwind, and other conditions at the destination runway and its surrounding area.

Pilots are relying on apps to do everything in this day and age: charting their routes, viewing the pertinent weather maps, completing safety checklists, getting help with navigating, and much more. From a technology standpoint, there’s never been a better time to be a pilot.

Posted February 13, 2015

New data reveals that a young American pilot starting out in today’s market can potentially earn $7 million over the next 44 years, assuming they make the right career moves along the way. Coast Flight projects that a 21-year-old aviator starting out as a flight instructor, following the school’s Airline Career Training (ACT) program, may be able to earn $7 million by the time they’re 65, assuming they follow the suggested path to a position as Captain for a major airline. Of course, salaries for airline pilots can vary widely based on factors such as experience, schooling, and the airline they are working for. When you look at the facts, though, there’s no denying that career aviators stand to earn a great deal of money in a job they love if they can go the distance. In the following post, we explain more about how pilots are paid, and how to get the most out of this rewarding career.

Encouraging Projections from Delta and SkyWest

Coast Flight’s Airline Career Training program is unique because it provides conditional job placement at SkyWest Airlines for the elite student pilots accepted into its ranks. According to PilotJobs.com, a First Officer at SkyWest Airlines may earn approximately $28,400 their first year, but by their fifth year they could be earning as much as $48,880. And if they are promoted to Captain in their sixth year, they could see this salary increase to as much as $81,520, which will continue increasing exponentially as their career advances. Moving on to a major airline such as Delta is recommended, though. Starting pay for a Delta Airlines 737-800 Pilot is $66,000. Upon promotion to Captain, though, Delta pilots earn a starting pay of $189,000. The top pay for a Delta Airlines Captain is approximately $205,000, but those flying a Boeing 777 can potentially earn $298,500 per year plus bonuses, or as much as $350,000 in one year.

Airline Pilot Career Earnings 2015

Going the Distance Pays Off

These figures may seem confusing, and if you’ve tried to do your own research on aviation salaries, you may be even more confused, as starting and ending pay for airline pilots varies so much. Each company pays its pilots differently, and since pilots are paid hourly the salary depends on how many hours one works in a year. There are wide variances between the pay for regional airline pilots and the pay for major airline pilots as well. According to figures from The United States Bureau of Labor Statistics, the median salary for airline pilots is $114,200, but starting pay for a regional airline First Officer could be as little as $28,000, while ending pay for a major airline Captain could be several hundred thousand per year. What this shows, however, is that going the distance pays off in the field of commercial aviation. Airline pilots have the potential to earn some of the top salaries in today’s job market, but it takes a few years to get there.

A Suggested Path for Career Pilots

Coast Flight’s ACT program is designed to give graduates a clear path to a career as an airline pilot, with job placement at regional SkyWest Airlines following the completion of their training in school and job experience as a flight instructor. After two years in flight instruction, pilots are ready to begin their placement as a First Officer for SkyWest Airlines. Three years later, the same pilot should be qualified to move up to a position of Captain for SkyWest. Ultimately, however, a pilot must take their years of experience at a regional airline to a position at a major airline to make the most out of this career. So, pilots are encouraged to move on to a position of First Officer for Coast’s partners at Delta Airlines by the end of their first decade in the field, which could potentially translate to a position as a Delta Airlines Captain some eight or so years later.

It all depends on the skill, discipline, hard work, and tenacity of the pilot, of course. But assuming that you have what it takes, you could start out making less than $30,000 a year as a flight instructor and end up making well over $200,000 a year by the time you retire from a major airline.

Posted January 29, 2015

02The aviation industry appears to be entering a golden age for new pilots as we continue into the New Year. The generous compensation and retention programs of airlines such as Endeavor Air, a subsidiary of Delta Air Lines that flies as Delta Connection, are evidence of this positive trend. The airline recently announced that it is beginning an $80,000 Pilot Retention Payment program to attract the best and brightest to its cockpits. With pilots earning more of the compensation, downtime and respect they deserve, it is an excellent time to enter this critical and esteemed profession – if you have what it takes.
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Endeavor’s Plan to Hire and Retain the Best

Endeavor Air, which describes itself as evoking “an image of innovation, excitement and the adventure of a journey,” will now provide pilots hired between 2015 and 2018 the opportunity to earn $20,000 in retention payments per year for the first four years of employment – that’s up to $80,000 just in bonus compensation! This generous opportunity comes in addition to the company’s competitive compensation package. Endeavor Air states that new pilots will earn $44,000 in their first year thanks to this new bonus, and their earnings will go up each year with a fourth year salary totaling over $80,000. If you’re looking for even more incentive, Endeavor pilots are also given up to 15 days off every month to relax or earn additional income, and have the opportunity to take as many as 35 days of vacation throughout the year. New hires aren’t the only ones with an opportunity to earn additional compensation at the airline, though. 04All current Endeavor pilots will have an opportunity to earn $2,000 for each new pilot they refer who successfully finishes the airline’s training program and joins the team.

What This Means for Prospective Student Pilots

Completing a flight training program, such as Coast Flight’s Airline Career Training (ACT) program, puts new pilots in an excellent position. There’s no denying that the airline industry is facing a shortage of pilots, and airlines like Endeavor are clearly in need of skilled new aviators to join their ranks. This pioneering retention program may be the most generous in the nation for regional pilots, but it isn’t the only one of its kind being offered at the moment. Other regional airlines such as Envoy Air, GoJet Airlines and Silver Airways have also announced signing bonuses ranging from $5,000 to $12,000 for new pilots.

With regional airlines going out of their way to attract new pilots, it looks like 2015 is an excellent time to begin training for a career in aviation. Contact Coast Flight to learn more.

Airlines will continue to add incentives to an aviation career as the 2015 Pilot Shortage shows no sign of slowing down.

Posted January 13, 2015

Email your resume to:  Careers@iflycoast.com

CFIs

Posted December 12, 2014

There is a commercial pilot shortage plaguing airlines across the nation, and as we look forward to 2015 it appears that this trend is only going to intensify. The current state of the aviation industry in the United States is causing headaches for airlines struggling to meet the demand for flights while ensuring their pilots are given the adequate rest they need. This shortage is also creating an ideal environment for new pilots completing flight school and embarking on a career in commercial aviation. With increasing demand for commercial pilots and continued growth in this job market is expected over the next 20 years!  The current pilot shortage is creating new opportunities for aviators to enter this highly regarded profession.

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Understanding the Pilot Shortage 

Many factors have contributed to the current commercial pilot shortage, which is expected to escalate in 2015 and beyond. The Federal Aviation Administration’s new rules for First Officer Qualifications include an increase in the number of hours that first officers are required to complete – to 1,500 hours – effectively reducing the number of qualified pilots in the job pool. Another new rule added to the Federal Aviation Regulations, FAR Part 117, has also increased the number of pilots that air carriers are required to employ to ensure adequate rest hours between shifts. This new rule alone has created an estimated increase in over 8% of total airline pilots the airlines must hire to comply.

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With older pilots retiring year after year, the demand for new pilots with adequate training and sufficient flight hours is that much greater. The demand is particularly intense for regional airlines in the U.S., which currently employ fewer than 18,000 pilots in total. At the same time, our nation’s major airlines are expected to require more than 18,000 new pilots due to retirements over the next decade, and Boeing even predicts that half a million new pilots will be needed over the next two decades. Many of the pilots currently working for regional airlines are expected to leave their current positions to help fill this void within major airlines, essentially shifting the shortage from one area of the industry to another. Airports across the nation are losing service, and many more are at risk. United Airlines has even ended its Cleveland service due to its shortage of qualified pilots available to fly.

What This Means for Budding Pilots

The situation appears dire for regional airlines and their passengers around the United States, but for those considering a career in aviation this shortage is creating abundant opportunities to join the work force. Pay rates are on the rise and many airlines offer signing bonuses to entice new pilots and to fill the increasing number of vacancies in the industry. Coast Flight even offers student pilots the opportunity to interview with SkyWest and secure a Conditional Offer of Employment, so those who have what it takes will already have a job waiting for them upon completion of their required training and flight hours.

There couldn’t be a better time to become an airline pilot. Contact Coast Flight today to learn more about what it takes.

See how airlines are reacting to this news in 2015 by reading about Endeavor’s Pilot Retention Program!

Posted December 12, 2014

United States Army Veteran Scott Miller’s story is a compelling and inspiring example of a man facing adversity yet refusing to give up on his dreams. On November 25, 2014, Scott completed his private pilot check ride and medical flight test at Coast Flight’s college partner, Indian Hills Community College in Ottumwa, Iowa. Becoming a certificated private pilot after serving in the National Guard is an impressive set of achievements on its own, but Miller’s circumstances make this feat all the more remarkable. Scott Miller lost the use of his legs after a motorcycle accident several years ago, but he didn’t let this impede his positive attitude and drive to succeed. Miller’s story serves as motivation for all future pilots and anyone who faces challenges on the road to success.

Overcoming Adversity scott

Many people would have given up and accepted defeat after losing the use of their legs, but not Scott Miller. The National Guard soldier fractured two vertebrae during a motorcycle accident following a drill weekend in Des Moines, Iowa several years back, which left him paraplegic. He was headed towards his home in the neighboring town of Albia that day when he hit a pothole and landed on railroad tracks near by. But instead of giving up on or settling for a lesser dream, Scott started flight training at Indian Hills Community College in late 2012.

Scott’s Path to an Aviation Career

After learning the basics in the college’s Redbird simulator, Miller began the required training and flight hours to prepare for his pilot check ride and medical flight test at Indian Hills Community College. He was able to complete all the required flight training to become a certificated private pilot. In large part, Miller’s success can be attributed to a Union hand control specially designed by a local aviation expert for the Cessna 172 he used during his private pilot training. Miller passed both tests with flying colors on November 25, 2014. His next goal is to complete the college’s advanced flight training, notes Indian Hills Chief Flight Instructor Darren Graham. “A group like this who believes in you and encourages you is what makes me have the drive to keep going,” Miller said during a recent interview The Ottumwa Courier. “Anyone can do it,” he later added.

After completing his advanced flight training, Scott’s next goal is to purchase his own airplane that he can use for charter flights, crop dusting, banner towing, firefighting or flight instruction. At that time he will be legally qualified to fly any private type of plane, excluding jets and airlines.

Proud College Partners

Coast flight is proud to call Indian Hills Community College a partner, enabling new opportunities for pilots-in-training to earn an accredited, online associate’s degree in Aviation Pilot Training while undergoing flight training at Coast’s San Diego campus. After completing the required flight ratings, students can even begin working as a commercial pilot as soon as they finish the online degree. See Scott’s experience at http://youtu.be/cMKKpX_u490

Contact Coast Flight today to learn more.

Posted November 14, 2014

Pilot's Return on Investment InfographicThere are many reasons why people become pilots. These reasons are often rooted in some childhood dream, or an innate desire to travel, or the sheer joy of taking flight, or a desire to lead and take care of others. Training to become a professional pilot is certainly one of the most respected, challenging, action-packed and fulfilling career paths a person can take. There are other considerations you need to make before choosing a career and investing in your education, though. Most people must also factor in the cost of their education and the potential salary they could earn once they enter their career field. Fortunately for pilots, the return on investment is excellent compared to other industries. Just consider how the ROI for professional pilots’ education and training matches up to that of other esteemed professionals including teachers, doctor and lawyers.

Total Cost of Education

In order to enter a revered profession such as teaching, legal counsel, medicine or aviation, you must first complete a high level of postsecondary education. The length of time that students must spend in an accredited university and/or training program, and the cost of doing so, inevitably varies depending on the professional career they are preparing for. While all of these professions require about the same level of undergraduate education, that is where the similarities end. Just consider the national averages for the cost of required education to become a teacher, pilot, lawyer and doctor:

Teachers:

• average undergraduate cost = $87,032
• average specialty education cost = N/A

Pilots:

• average undergraduate cost = $87,032
• average specialty education cost = $51,900

Lawyers:

• average undergraduate cost = $87,032
• average specialty education cost = $55,416

Doctors:

• average undergraduate cost = $87,032
• average specialty education cost = $232,564

Median Annual Salary

Of the four honorable professions under the spotlight, it’s easy to see that teachers spend the least on their postsecondary education. This is because many teaching jobs in elementary, middle or high schools only require a bachelor’s degree (although some K-12 teaching jobs require a master’s degree, and all postsecondary teaching jobs require at least a master’s degree). And with an average total education cost of $87,032 for teachers, $138,932 for pilots, $142,488 for lawyers and $319,596 for doctors, it’s clear that doctors spend the most (by a landslide). What really matters, though, is the potential returns for this initial investment in education and training. Consider the median annual salaries for teachers, pilots, lawyers and doctors in the United States:

Teachers:

• median annual salary = $49,140

Pilots:

• median annual salary = $111,680

Lawyers:

• median annual salary = $110,590

Doctors:

• median annual salary = $186,044

Return on Investment

What this all means is that of these four career paths, pilots enjoy the greatest return on investment. It’s important to consider that teachers typically have 43 career earning years, pilots typically have 42, lawyers typically have 40, and doctors typically have 34. So if you figure the return on investment for each career, which is ((annual salary × years in career) – education costs), and divide that by the education costs, you will find the following:

• Teachers earn $23 for every $1 invested in education
• Pilots earn $33 for every $1 invested in education
• Lawyers earn $30 for every $1 invested in education
• Doctors earn $19 for every $1 invested in education

In addition to the great return on investment in the aviation field, the high median annual salary for aviation graduates allows them to pay off their education costs more quickly than these other skilled professionals as they move up in their careers. This economic freedom enables pilots to enjoy the things they love about their careers, from adventure and travel to responsibility and respect, without as much worry.

Posted November 14, 2014

If you’ve flown recently in the United States or abroad, you may have noticed some cuts in service. You may also notice a few changes around the U.S. airline industry if you plan on flying soon. There is a growing shortage of qualified domestic pilots in the U.S. according to figures from major airlines, and this shortage is only expected to grow as the demand for new pilots continues to increase while the number of existing pilots diminishes. It is an international problem, in fact, as airlines from Japan to Latin America are seeing the effects. In the United States, the facts about this domestic airline pilot shortage should speak for themselves.

Understanding the Domestic Pilot Shortage

This shortage of pilots in the U.S. and abroad isn’t exactly a surprise, as the International Civil Aviation Organization (the UN’s aviation agency) began warning about a shortage of qualified pilots across the globe two years ago. The shortage is hitting the U.S. sooner and harder than anticipated, though, leaving some airlines with no choice but to cut services. There are several reasons for this shortage, adding up to an unanticipated demand for new pilots:

• Many of the most experienced and esteemed pilots in the industry have recently retired or are expecting to retire, for starters.
• The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has also increased the training requirements for new pilots, deterring some students and keeping those who do want to be pilots in school a bit longer.
• New industry standards have increased the required amount of rest pilots must have before returning to their next shift.

These are good rules, of course, that add to the safety of the airlines. Adhering to them does present some initial challenges, though. It has been particularly troublesome for regional airlines, who are not able to offer the same pay as major carriers. Of course, existing pilots will inevitably snap up higher paying jobs as soon as they can. With many pilots from the major carriers retiring or scheduled to retire in the near future, regional airlines are losing pilots faster than they can think about replacing them. The result, for now, is cancelled flights and reduced services. But there are solutions on the horizon.

U.S. Airline Industry Hurries to Find Solutions

While flights are being cancelled and services are being cut, airlines are also hurrying to hire new pilots and flight training institutions are working diligently to recruit new students. Delta Airlines has recalled all of the pilots who were furloughed during tougher times, and has been working to hire an additional 20-50 pilots a month throughout the year. United Airlines has also reported that it plans to recall hundreds of its furloughed pilots. The union that represents American Airlines Group expects to lose as many as half of its 8,800 pilots as they retire or leave the company in the next decade, and anticipates the need to hire as many as 100 pilots a month to keep up with the demands.

So, while there may be some inconveniences for U.S. passengers for the time being, the aviation industry is working hard to solve it. For example, Coast Flight is addressing the shortage issue. For budding pilots, this is a great time to enter the industry, as there are many jobs currently available and many more to open up soon.
with its Aviation Career Training (ACT) program. It removes the post-training stress of finding a job by offering employment prior to the beginning of training, allowing future pilots the freedom of mind to focus on getting through the program and into the career path of their dreams. So if you are a budding pilot, now is an excellent time to start your career.

http://iflycoast.com/aviation-career-training-program/