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Posted September 24, 2014

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Paul Hardy

ACT Fall ’14

Q: Why did you choose to become a pilot?

A: It has been a dream since Elementary school to become a pilot. This dream orginally saw a hurrdle with my vision problems,
I began looking into solution and Lasik came on the map and helped me overcome and realize dream. I have always had an underlying love for aviation and flying.


Q: What was the biggest reason you chose the ACT program?

A: To be able to use the GI Bill to cover flight training 100%. The security of having a conditional offer of employment from SkyWest Airlines to have a clear path to a job made it an easy decision.


Q: What was the hardest part of the screening?

A: Being nervous to take the test and interviews. Wonder “Am i good enough?” “Is this something I can overcome?” But after the process and succeeding I was filled with pride.


Q: What did you most enjoy about the screening?

A: The environment at Coast felt so welcoming, it felt like a family and it is full of happy people. By having that support along with the training makes every sessions enjoyable.


Q: Who was the first person you called, and why, when you found out you had been accepted to the ACT Program and had a conditional offer of employment from SkyWest Airlines?

A: My wife because of her endless encouragement through my life and the screening and interview process for this program. It just made me ecstatic to tell her the great news about my career future.


Q: Since you have started your college and flight training, what do you enjoy the most?

A: Being in the air, flying the planes and connecting with the instructors by feeding from their energy and excitement. Also, there is no better feeling than taking off in an airplane.

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Tyler Kubota

ACT Fall ’14

Q: Why did you choose to become a pilot?

A: The simple answer is that flying is the most incredible feeling and to get the opportunity to fly airplanes is a dream come true.
I also saw it as an opportunity to work alongside likeminded people with a passion for their work,
and being around the other ACT students and Coast Flight staff who are so passionate about flying makes me even more excited to be a pilot.


Q: What was the biggest reason you chose the ACT program?

A: The ACT program stood out because of its relationship Coast Flight has with SkyWest Airlines.
The program offers an unparalleled level of peace of mind and guidance with the conditional offer of employment from the airlines.
Once I actually heard from some individuals from SkyWest, it became clear that SkyWest values a positive attitude and pilots who love to go to work,
two things that I really love about SkyWest.


Q: What was the hardest part of the screening?

A: The interviews were challenging, partly because I was so nervous. However the whole screening process felt unique and really forces the applicant to think like a pilot, which was pretty fun.


Q: What did you most enjoy about the screening?

A: The simulator evaluation was definitely my favorite part. Just being in the cockpit and flying a plane was a lot of fun, even if it was a simulation.


Q: Who was the first person you called, and why, when you found out you had been accepted to the ACT Program and had a conditional offer of employment from SkyWest Airlines?

A: I told my girlfriend and my parents, simply because they’ve both been so supportive of me and my decision to pursue an aviation career. I feel very lucky to have them around.


Q: Since you have started your college and flight training, what do you enjoy the most?

A: I’m just enjoying the whole experience of learning how to be a pilot. I feel really fortunate to be in the program so I’m doing my best to work hard to be the best pilot I can be.

Posted August 5, 2014

Coast Flight Open House

Join Coast Flight’s Annual Open House August 9th 10am-2pm

Recent reports show there is a shortage of trained and qualified aviation graduates, with an estimated shortfall of more than 70,000 U.S. air transport pilots. This trend is certainly not limited to the United States, though. In fact, two of the biggest budget carriers in Japan are planning to cancel hundreds of flights this summer due to a shortage of available pilots. This goes to show that the problem with pilot shortages is an international problem, and that it may be an ideal time for students to get the required training and enter the exciting field of aviation.
 

Vanilla Air to Cancel Flights in June

 
The Japanese budget airline Vanilla Air recently reported that there are not enough pilots to fly all of the scheduled flights this month, and attempts to secure enough pilots have not been successful in time to meet current demands. Additionally, some crewmembers have also recently moved on, leaving Vanilla Air between a rock and a hard place. All Nippon Airways (ANA), the owner and operator of Vanilla Air, says that it will have no choice but…

professional pilotProjecting a professional image is a key requirement for achieving success as a commercial pilot. The National Transportation Safety Board considers pilot professionalism to be of such critical importance in the aviation field that it sponsored a 2010 forum specifically devoted to this topic. Appearance, decisiveness, initiative and an unselfish attitude are essential elements in building your reputation as a consummate professional.
 
#1. Appearance
 
Keeping your uniform clean and pressed can help you present a crisp, pulled-together image for your passengers and crew. Meticulous attention to detail will help you look your best on the job:
 
• Shoes and belts should match and should be in a dark or neutral shade. Shoes for both men and women should be polished and appropriate to the working environment.
• Hats, if worn, should be in good taste and be worn in the appropriate way.
• Neatly trimmed, clean hair is a must for both men and women in the aviation industry. Extreme fashion statements are to be avoided when choosing hairstyles. For men, a neatly groomed mustache…

As the second in command to the captain of an aircraft, a first officer must always be ready to support his or her fellow pilot, the plane’s crew members and any passengers onboard. First officers are expected to act dependably and responsibly at all times in order to prove that they too have what it takes to be captain one day. The expectations are high, but a first officer who is able to prove their dedication and trustworthiness will often be able to move up through the ranks and become a captain. Jeff Bushnell, Col USAF (Ret), Director of Education and Aviation Standards for Coast Flight Training, recently discussed the expectations that first officers must meet in order to support their captain and prove that they are captain material. According to Bushnell, a first officer who possesses the following qualities and lives up to the following expectations should be a success.
 
The Top Expectations for Airline First Officers

 

• A Completely Competent Professional

In order to be a competent professional, the first officer must be a safe and skilled pilot above all…

Jeff Airline Pilot

Coast Flight Training has created a new position to foster the highest quality preparation for its pilot trainees and has named Col. Jeff Bushnell, USAF (Ret.) Director of Education and Aviation Standards. The retired Air Force colonel, flight examiner and squadron commander brings 43 years of military and airline aviation experience. Col. Bushnell retired from Continental Airlines with over 20,000 flight hours.

“Jeff brings over forty years of experience training pilots to military and commercial aviation standards,” said Will Dryden, Coast Flight’s President. “Jeff developed scenario-based training (SBT) while in the Air Force, long ago adapting it to the commercial carriers and has developed and ushered through the FAA-approval of Coast Flight’s unique scenario-based training program. Among other benefits of this proprietary scenario-based training, student pilots fly the same routes to the same airports as the airlines while training through various high traffic zones; they finish their training more than prepared for an airline job.”

Col. Bushnell served 29 years in the US Air Force Reserves where he began as a…

Bryan Simmons Marine OneCoast Flight Training has named a new Director of Flight Operations, LtCol Bryan W. Simmons, who recently retired from the United States Marine Corps after two decades of service. Simmons served multiple flying tours in Operation Iraqi Freedom conducting casualty evacuation and was awarded nine Air Medals for his actions and a Meritorious Service Medal for his achievements as a Presidential Command Pilot during the Bush and Obama administrations.

“As Director of Flight Operations, Bryan exercises operational control, directs the execution of company policies and procedures, and ensures that all activities of the flight department, including flight operations, personnel and equipment, comply with FAA standards and company standards core values,” said Will Dryden, Coast’s President and CEO.

LtCol Simmons has planned and supervised the professional development of aviators for over 16 years and was a Navy Flight School Instructor and Operations Officer for multiple organizations.
Mr. Dryden continued, “Bryan has been instrumental in the development of Coast Flight’s Aviation Career Training – ACT Program. He is personally engaged in the success of…

Delta Flight Cancelled When Pilot Times Out While Taxiing To Runway

 
First Pilot For The Morning Flight Did Not Arrive At The Airport
 
Passengers on a Delta flight set to depart from JFK Airport Friday were understandably frustrated when one pilot failed to show up for his 8:15 am flight, and a second pilot who happened to show up at the ticket counter and offered to take the flight, timed out under new federal crew rest regulations while he was taxiing to the runway.
 
But he passengers’ travails were not over. Television Station KARE reports that after the flight was cancelled nearly 12 hours after it was scheduled to depart, Delta put them up in a hotel with the promise of a 6:30 am flight the next day. But when they dutifully showed up for the early morning flight, again, there was no pilot. The gate agent said the pilot was late arriving to the airport, and the flight would be delayed.
 
The flight finally got away from JFK at about 8:15, almost exactly 24 hours after it was supposed to have departed….

Posted February 26, 2014

CNN recently reported on the pilot shortage on a global scale to put in perspective what is causing the increase of pilot demand across the world. They cover the current and future pilot trends in Asia and other evolving markets and how it effects the world aviation market. Below you can follow the link to the CNN article related to pilot shortage.

Click here to view the CNN article: World needs pilots! Record growth leads to record need

CNN article

Posted February 25, 2014

The Wall Street Journal recently wrote about the current pilot shortage and the reasoning behind the increasing demand. The article covers how airline growth, stricter minimum requirements, forced retirement of the aging workforce and new FAA regulations all play a part in the increasing necessity for qualified pilots. Follow the link below to read Wall Street Journal’s take on the pilot shortage in 2014.

Click here to read the Wall Street Journal article.

WSJ Article

 

Coast Flight Difference

Coast Flight Training, founded in 2008 has been one of San Diego's fastest growing companies, three years running. Coast is a VA Approved, FAA Part-141 flight school and is TSA and SEVP approved to host international students. Coast is also an acknowledged leader in Cirrus's training center network.

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Contact via:

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2014 Coast Flight Training. All rights reserved.

 

3753 John J Montgomery Dr. San Diego, CA 92123

info@iflycoast.com

Coast Flight Difference

Coast Flight Training, founded in 2008 has been one of San Diego's fastest growing companies, three years running. Coast is a VA Approved, FAA Part-141 flight school and is TSA and SEVP approved to host international students. Coast is also an acknowledged leader in Cirrus's training center network.

Sign up for Coast Flight

Contact via:

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Linked-in
  • Youtube

2014 Coast Flight Training. All rights reserved.

 

3753 John J Montgomery Dr. San Diego, CA 92123

info@iflycoast.com